My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Album Review: Toby Keith – ‘Dream Walkin”

91o+pLohEcL._SL1416_After being bounced around between PolyGram Nashville’s various imprints, Toby Keith found himself back at his original label Mercury, for 1997’s Dream Walkin’, which also found him working with co-producer James Stroud for the first time. Stroud co-produced all of Toby’s albums through 2005 and was part of his big commercial breakthrough that would begin about a year later with “How Do You Like Me Now?” That in-your-face record marked a huge change of direction for Keith, so it is somewhat surprising to find that the first Keith-Stroud collaboration is such a tame affair.

There was little at this early date to suggest that the Keith-Stroud partnership would last for nearly a decade. In fact, for a while it looked like it might have been a big mistake. Dream Walkin’ was certified gold, achieving about half the sales level of Toby’s previous albums and it was his first album not to produce any number one hits. That being said, it did produce three Top 5 singles, while a fourth just made the Top 40.

The album is more pop/AC leaning than Keith’s earlier albums, so it was a bit of a creative stretch, with mixed results. The first single “We Were In Love”, which peaked at #2 is a bit too slickly produced for my liking, although Stroud and Keith managed to resist the urge to turn it into a bombastic mess as other artists and producers undoubtedly would have. British rocker Sting made his only entry on the country charts when he joined Toby for a remake of his hit “I’m So Happy I Can’t Stop Crying”. It is like “We Were In Love” in two ways: it peaked at #2, and it’s not quite my cup of tea. I like the title track a lot better. “Dream Walkin'”, which peaked at #5 is probably my favorite of Toby’s early singles. Based on the title, “Double Wide Paradise” seems like something that Toby would record in the next stage of his career, but the song itself is terrible from both a lyrical and production standpoint. Radio apparently agreed; the record died at #40, making it Keith’s lowest charting single up to that time. I didn’t even realize that it had been a single.

Like the singles, the rest of the album is somewhat of a mixed bag. “You Don’t Anymore”, which Toby wrote with Eric Silver, is a decent ballad. I’d like to hear Toby re-do “Jacky Don Tucker (Play By The Rules Miss All The Fun)” and “She Ran Away with a Rodeo Clown” (also a Keith original); I suspect both would get a less restrained treatment today. The remaining album cuts are forgettable filler, with the exception of the closing track, the excellent “I Don’t Understand My Girlfriend”, which I thoroughly enjoyed. The trademark Toby Keith humor and the western swing arrangement make it the album’s standout track.

Dream Walkin’ was the last album Toby released on Mercury. He and Stroud recorded one more album, “How Do You Like Me Now?”, which the label refused to release, prompting Keith to ask for a release from his contract. He purchased the rights to the album and released it on DreamWorks, where it was just the beginning of bigger and better things. Although not his best work, Dream Walkin’ can be obtained cheaply both on CD and as a digital download, and as such, is worth a listen.

Grade: B

Classic Rewind: Toby Keith and Sting – ‘I’m So Happy I Can’t Stop Crying’

Single Review: Charles Kelley feat. Eric Paslay and Dierks Bentley – ‘The Driver’

Screen-Shot-2015-10-04-at-8.08.01-PMI’ll admit that seven years ago, I was a Lady Antebellum fan. Their debut album, co-produced by the illustrious Victoria Shaw, showcased a band with tremendous promise. While not earth shattering, “Love Don’t Live Here” had grit that proved they were a force to be reckoned with. “I Run To You” made good on their potential and deservedly won the CMA Single of the Year award. “Need You Now” and “American Honey” were also good, but the album that surrounded them marked the beginning of the end. After just five singles, Lady Antebellum devolved into a second-rate pop act.

When they announced their upcoming hiatus, I was thrilled. Would they use this time to reevaluate what had happened to their sound? Charge their depleted artistic batteries? Well, we got an answer this week when Charles Kelley announced a solo single and upcoming EP. As Lady Antebellum’s artistic prowess went south, Kelley’s rich baritone went along with it. He used to be the guy who let loose, a nice counterbalance to Hillary Scott’s softer soprano.

Now we have “The Driver” to contend with. Kelley’s first solo single is a piano drenched soft rock ballad that wouldn’t be out of place in Lady Antebellum’s repertoire. The track is listenable and while the lyric doesn’t have anything to say at all, it contains zero traces of bro, metro, or any other of the current trends turning mainstream country into the unrecognizable laughing stock it is today.

Is this a step in the right direction? No, it’s not. What is this song even about? You have three acts, sung by Kelley, Eric Paslay, and Dierks Bentley respectively. Kelley portrays the driver, the one in charge of bringing the circus to town. Paslay is the dreamer sitting in the front row, enjoying the show. Bentley meanwhile is the singer, giving the audience all he has during his performance. While the characters are well thought out, they don’t go anywhere. There’s no reason to care about any of them, so we don’t. Why is this song even called “The Driver” (opposed to “The Dreamer” or “The Singer”)? Is he the glue that holds everyone together?

Like a lot of modern country songs that hint at substance, “The Driver” has good bones and a clever premise. It fails because it doesn’t take the story anywhere. All we have are descriptions of three characters – no depth or soul to make them more than constructs on a casting director’s call sheet. What’s missing is the actor brave enough to take what’s on the page and turn it into a multi-dimensional character worth caring about. Why is it so novel to actually develop a story into something worthwhile?

The only credit I can give to Kelley and Co is that they’ve presented us with a tune that doesn’t out rightly offend in any major way (except the fact IT’S NOT COUNTRY. AT ALL). They’re committed vocally. I don’t hear any noticeable use of computers in place of instruments. They appear to actually be singing. None of these things should ever be a cause for celebration, but in the current climate, we have to take what we can get. I’ll reserve the ‘F’ and ‘D’ grades for the pure dreck. In comparison, “The Driver” isn’t horrible, it’s just lazy in every noticeable way.

Grade: C-

Classic Rewind: Holly Dunn – ‘That’s What Your Love Does To Me/Traveler’s Prayer’

Album Review: Toby Keith – ‘Blue Moon’

TobyKeithBlueMoonThe shuffling of Toby Keith from label to label (all were a subsidiary of Mercury Nashville) had reached its apex by the time Blue Moon, his third album, was released in 1996. Keith was now the flagship artist on the Music City division of A&M, a label originally started in the early 1960s in California. In the process, Harold Shedd was dropped as Keith’s producer. Keith would step up and co-produce the album with Nelson Larkin, who had assisted Shedd on Keith’s previous records.

After he took complete control of his career in the 2000s, Keith reminisced about his 1990s work saying he was known as the ballad singer in his early years. Keith certainly has the voice for such material and from a singles standpoint, Blue Moon delivered. He solely penned the album’s lead single, the title track, which found him at his most tender. The AC-leaning lament, about a guy taking responsibility for his role in ending his relationship, peaked at #2.

The second single was the cinematic “A Woman’s Touch,” which Keith composed with Wayne Perry. The track opens with sweeping guitars and cymbals that nicely give way to more of a typical Keith arrangement. “A Woman’s Touch,” which peaked just outside the top 5, is a very good song although not strong enough to be much remembered today.

The album’s final single (and Keith’s third #1) is probably the greatest use of clever wordplay in a country love song I’ve ever heard. “Me Too,” which Keith co-wrote with frequent collaborator Chuck Cannon, finds him stepping into the shoes of a man who has difficulty saying ‘I love you:’

Oh, I’m just a man, that’s the way I was made

I’m not too good at sayin’ what you need me to say

It’s always right there on the tip of my tongue

It might go unsaid, but it won’t go undone

So when those three little words come so easy to you

I hope you know what I mean when I say, me too

Keith had a hand in writing all but one of the album’s remaining seven tracks, including two with Perry. “She’s Perfect” is a similarly styled ballad and another tune in which Keith admits he’s at fault for the state of his relationship:

There’s nothin’ wrong with her, she’s perfect

She’s as pure as she can be

She’d never say, but the only mistake she ever made was me

It might appear to you she’s broken

By the teardrops in her eyes

But there’s nothin’ wrong with her, she’s perfect

I’m the one who made her cry

Another such ballad is “The Lonely,” the Cannon and Lari White co-write Keith didn’t help compose. The track isn’t terrible, but it isn’t memorable either. “Every Night,” a semi-uptempo, finds Keith helping his woman through the heartbreak wrought from her previous relationship. “She’s Gonna Get It,” the other co-write with Perry, is faux uptempo encumbered by a clumsy lyric. “Lucky Me” is an above average rocker about a man reveling in the emptiness in his home in the wake of a breakup. While the premise shows promise, Keith should’ve gone further with the lyric and provided some kind of interesting twist or clever ending. “Hello,” which finds Keith in Mexico, closes Blue Moon with pure dreck.

“Closin’ Time At Home” may suffer from a suffocating and uninteresting arrangement, but it should’ve been a single. Keith is a man in San Bernardino thinking about the woman he left back home in Tulsa:

If it’s midnight in California, must be closin’ time in Oklahoma

I know that she’s already danced another night away

And these west coast nights sure seem colder

Knowin’ somebody else’s arms will hold her

Midnight in California means it’s closin’ time at home

Blue Moon finds Keith in a holding pattern. The three singles are excellent and kept him within country radio’s good graces. But the album presents a subdued and average Keith not taking any chances either lyrically or sonically. The guy who brought us the memorable run of iconic 1990s fare on his first two studio sets was gone and we still had another three years before he became the artist who took the bull by its horns. This Keith feels like a timid people-pleaser.

Blue Moon is the weakest of his Mercury/Polydor/Polygram/A&M recordings. Its no wonder he unapologetically tore down the walls and rebuilt the house. If he’d stayed in this vein, he would’ve been just another 1990s has-been. Toby Keith is too good for material like what he co-wrote, co-produced and recorded here.

Grade: B

Classic Rewind: Lorrie Morgan – ‘I Guess You Had To Be There’

Album Review: Toby Keith – ‘Boomtown’

41SMJD8V6ALReleased in 1994, Boomtown was Toby Keith’s second album, and probably my favorite album of his early years. It was Toby’s first album to reach the top ten of Billboard’s Country Album chart and the top fifty of Billboard’s All-Genres Album chart

“Who’s That Man” was the first single released from the album and the second #1 single for Keith reaching the top on both the US and Canadian country charts. The song is a serious ballad about the life the narrator left behind when he and his wife separated. The topic has been tackled many times both in literature and music but rarely as succinctly

They paved the road through the neighborhood
I guess the county finally fixed good
It was gettin’ rough
Someone finally complained enough

Fight the tears back with a smile
Stop and look for a little while
Oh it’s plain to see
The only thing missing is me

That’s my house & that’s my car
That’s my dog in my back yard
There’s the window to the room
Where she lays her pretty head
I planted that tree out by the fence
Not long after we moved in
That’s my kids and that’s my wife
Whose that man, runnin’ my life

“Big Ol’ Truck” was the fourth and least successful single from the album, reaching #15. The song is a generic mid-tempo rocker. It is not bad but not great either.

“Victoria’s Secret” is a gentle ballad that is far more than the clever word play title would suggest. I think this would have made a good single: 

Her husband’s always working and he’s never home
When he’s there with her he’s still gone
And she can’t stand living and loving alone
Well she’s got her children to raise, that’s why she can’t let it show
I’m the only one who knows Victoria’s secret

The first three songs were Toby Keith compositions. “No Honor Among Thieves” is outside material from the pens of Nathan Crow and David Wills. Up-tempo and bluesy, the song makes a nice album track.

“Upstairs, Downtowns” was the second single of the album, reaching #10. The song is the story of a young girl leaving home to discover the world. The song was a Toby Keith-Carl Goff Jr. collaboration as was the album’s third single, the wry “You Ain’t Much Fun (Since I Stopped Drinkin’)” . I feel that this was the first Toby Keith single in which Toby’s sense of humor truly manifested itself. I was somewhat stunned when this song didn’t make it to #1 (it reached #2). It is hard for me to pick an all-time favorite Toby Keith song, but this one, with its infectious chorus and shuffle beat, is a strong contender:

I used to come home late and not a minute too soon
Barking like a dog, howling at the moon
You’d be mad as an ol’ wet hen, up all night wonderin’ where I been
I’d fall down and say come help me honey
You laughed out loud, I guess you thought it was funny
I sobered up, and I got to thinkin’
Girl you ain’t much fun since I quit drinkin’

Now I’m paintin’ the house and I’m mendin’ the fence
I guess I gone out and lost all my good sense
Too much work is hard for your health
I could’ve died drinkin’, now I’m killing myself
And I’m feedin’ the dog, sackin’ the trash
It’s honey do this, honey do that
I sobered up, and I got to thinkin’
Girl you ain’t much fun since I quit drinkin’

“In Other Words” is a nice love ballad with no particular potential as a single. Written by Tony Haselden and Tim Mensy, the song is a nice jog-along ballad

Toby’s “Woman Behind the Man” is another nice slow ballad love song a man’s paean to his woman.
“Life Was a Play (The World a Stage)” was written by the trio of Johnny McCollum, Pal Rakes and Nelson Larkin. The song is a mid-tempo ballad that I think should have been a single for someone. To me it sounds like somthing tailor made for Brooks and Dunn, Toby does it well but I think it better suited for B&D or some such similar act.

For whatever reason the title track, “Boomtown” was not released as a single. The song has a some of Toby’s strongest lyrics as a composer. Perhaps the song hit a little too close to home for some people. In fact, it is still current and still relevant. Anyway I love the song.

The people came here from parts unknown
Sleepin’ in their cars ’cause they didn’t have homes
Thought this place was the promised land
If you could roughneck, we could use a good man
Come on boy let me show you around
You could make a lot of money here

Livin’ in a boomtown
We’ll some build bars and big hotels
Downshift drive and the people live well
High on the hog and wild on the range
Pocket full of cash instead of chump change
This place kicks when the sun goes down

See oil was the blood that flowed through the soul
To keep a man workin’ when it’s forty below
Relent to the devil in the cold cold ground
Trying to make a dollar here livin’ in a boomtown

Six short years the oil fields went
Rigs came down and the money got spent
And the wisemen saved for a rainy day
The fools packed up and moved away
The hotels closed and the bars shut down
And it got real quiet livin’ in a boomtown

Boomtown is definitely a county album with a sterling cast of musicians including Sonny Garrish on steel guitar. I regard this as the nascent Toby Keith showing more still signs of the artist he was to become.

Grade: A

Classic Rewind: Toby Keith ft Ricky Skaggs – ‘You Ain’t Much Fun’

Classic Rewind: The Whites and the Browns – ‘Amazing Grace’

Week ending 10/3/15: #1 singles this week in country music history

milsap-21955 (Sales): I Don’t Care — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Jukebox): I Don’t Care — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Disc Jockeys): I Don’t Care — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1965: Only You (Can Break My Heart) — Buck Owens (Capitol)

1975: Daydreams About Night Things — Ronnie Milsap (RCA)

1985: Lost in the Fifties Tonight (In The Still of the Night) — Ronnie Milsap (RCA)

1995: I Like It, I Love It — Tim McGraw (Curb)

2005: A Real Fine Place To Start — Sara Evans (RCA)

2015: Strip It Down — Luke Bryan (Capitol)

2015 (Airplay): Save It For a Rainy Day — Kenny Chesney (Blue Chair/Columbia)

Classic Rewind: Vince Gill – ‘One More Last Chance’

Classic Rewind: Toby Keith – ‘Should’ve Been A Cowboy’

Album Review: Toby Keith – ‘Toby Keith’

toby keithToby Keith’s debut album in 1993 showcased him not only as an impressive vocalist with a big booming voice, but as a singer-songwriter. He wrote all but two of the songs, and with no recourse to co-writers.

‘Should’ve Been A Cowboy’, the first single, was an immediate, and enduring, success for Toby, speeding to the top of the charts, and becoming the most played song on country radio for the whole decade of the 1990s. Filled with visual imagery and nostalgia for the sanitized old movie and TV Western depictions of a cowboy’s life, it is pleasant listening but the polar opposite of the harsher reality offered in ‘Went For A Ride’, recorded by Radney Foster the previous year.

The contemporary styled ballad ‘He Ain’t Worth Missing’ reached #5, and is earnestly sung, although the keyboards now sound dated. ‘Under The Fall’ is on much the same theme (consoling a lovelorn woman), but is a less well written song.

The last two singles both peaked at #2. The catchy and rocking ‘A Little Less Talk And A Lot More Action’ was one of the two non Keith-penned tunes, although it heralds much of his later work. It was written by Keith Hinton and Jimmy Alan Stewart. Stewart also co-wrote (with Chuck Cannon) ‘Some Kinda Good Kinda Hold On Me’(written by Chuck Cannon and Jimmy Alan Stewart), which is up-tempo filler with an effective groove and an extended sax solo.

The final single, ‘Wish I Didn’t Know Now’, with its wounded take on deception and lost love, is my favourite of the singles. Also very good is the breakup ballad ‘Ain’t No Thang’, although I’m mildly irritated by the spelling choice.

‘Valentine’ is an overly forceful ballad which would work better with a subtler, more vulnerable approach (I’m tempted to say with anyone other than Toby Keith singing it). He shows, however, that he is capable of subtlety on ‘Mama Come Quick’, a nicely constructed tune which compares a childhood hurt to the pain of a broken relationship, and pays tribute to a mother’s loving consolation. Very nice.

The closing track, ‘Close But No Guitar’, is a wryly amusing story song which I enjoyed a great deal. The protagonist has been left behind by an old girlfriend who has gone on to make it big in Nashville. He ends up covering her hit songs for pennies in the same old bar they started out in together.

The album reflected the performance of the singles, and was certified platinum. It was a bright start to Toby Keith’s career and stands up reasonably well today

Grade: B+

Classic Rewind: Zac Brown Band – ‘Highway 20 Ride’

Spotlight Artist: Toby Keith

toby-keith-1Our October spotlight artist is one of the few remaining commercial links to the 1990s and one who arguably was the face of country music during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Toby Keith Covel was born in Clinton, Oklahoma on July 8, 1961. His interest in music was sparked during summers spent with his grandmother, who owned a supper club in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He played football in high school and played semi-professionally after graduation. During that time he was also a member of the Easy Money Band, which played in local bars, but the oil industry, where he worked as a derrick hand, paid the bills.

Covel dropped his surname for professional purposes and moved to Nashville in 1990, with the goal of obtaining a recording contract by his 30th birthday. With the self-imposed deadline looming, Keith was about to give up and return to Oklahoma, when he was signed to Mercury Records by Harold Shedd. His first single for the label, “Should’ve Been A Cowboy” quickly climbed to #1. He spent the next five years being shuffled around between Mercury and its sister labels Polydor and A&M. His records consistently made the Top 10 and he regularly achieved platinum level sales, yet he struggled to stand out from a pack that was dominated by artists such as Garth Brooks, Clint Black, Alan Jackson, and Travis Tritt.

All of that would change when Keith left Mercury in 1998 to sign with the fledgling DreamWorks Nashville label. The following year he released his breakthrough single, the in-your-face “How Do You Like Me Now”, which he had co-written with Chuck Cannon some years earlier, but Mercury had not let him record. The suits at DreamWorks also had some reservations, but they quickly abated when the record spent five weeks at #1 in the spring of 2000.

Keith became a label exec himself, founding the Show Dog Nashville imprint when DreamWorks closed its doors in 2005. Show Dog Nashville has since merged with Universal South and is now known as Show Dog-Universal Music. By this time, Toby’s bombastic personality and his political views were beginning to overshadow his music. His response to the events of September 11, 2001, “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue (The Angry American)” played to country music’s conservative base and earned him the contempt of the political left, as did 2003’s pro-military “American Solider”. Both records were multi-week #1s, and eventually led to a very bitter public feud with The Dixie Chicks’ Natalie Maines.

Although radio has cooled towards Toby Keith in the past few years, he remains one of country music’s most visible and prolific artists. His latest album 35 MPH Town, will be released on October 9th, providing us with the opportunity to look back at Toby’s career so far.

Classic Rewind: Alabama – ‘I’m In A Hurry (And Don’t Know Why)’

Album Review: Alabama – ‘Southern Drawl’

southern drawlI was concerned that Alabama’s long-awaited comeback album would pander too much to the current state of country radio, and the first single did nothing to change that. Fortunately there are some bright spots and one outstanding song.

The title track and lead single sounds like a straight rock song. It’s actually not bad for what it is, apart from the woeful rap section and the very, very cliche’d picture of the South it paints. Somehow it took four writers to create it. The song at least has an insistent groove and the band sound as if they are enjoying themselves. It is not the worst track on the album; that dubious honor goes to the resolutely uncatchy ‘Foot Stompin’ Music’, whose title alone probably tells you all you need to know. The only good thing about it is the fiddle break at the end.

I was intrigued by the quirky title, ‘Hillbilly Wins The Lotto Money’, written by Randy Owen’s son Heath. It is an interesting story song with a bluesy arrangement which grew on me with repeated listens. The perky ‘Back To The Country’ features the obligatory token banjo to accompany a lyric about feeling out of place in the city and longing for a rural home. The clichés are saved by Randy Owen’s believable delivery. The mid-tempo country-rock ‘American Farmer’ pays tribute to its subjects’ hard work.

‘No Bad Days’ took six writers including James Otto, Jerry Jeff Walker’s son Django, and Jeff Cook, but is a pretty good song in folk-rock vein sung by Cook. Teddy Gentry leads on the more urgent ‘It’s About Time’ .

The ballads tend to lean AC rather than country. ‘Wasn’t Through Lovin’ You Yet’ just feels a little uninspired. ‘This Ain’t Just A Song’, written by Tim James, Rivers Rutherford and George Teren, is quite pleasant; and the Randy Owen-penned ‘As Long As There’s Love’ has a pretty melody and idealistic lyric.

‘One On One’ has Randy Owen doing his familiar laughably over-the top Conway Twitty impersonation, but the parts which are actually sung rather than spoken in an attempt to sound sexy, are pretty good.

The gentle ‘Come Find Me’ is very pretty indeed, and features Alison Krauss on fiddle and harmony vocals, although the latter are rather low in the mix. It was written by Tony Lane and David Lee. By far the best song here, though, is left to the end of the set. The beautiful ‘I Wanna Be There’ is addressed to a newborn baby girl, with the besotted new father expressing his hopes that he will experience all the joys of fatherhood in the years to come. It was written by Paul Overstreet and Harley Allen, and is genuinely moving. This alone makes a distinctly patchy album worthwhile, and I recommend both it and ‘Come Find Me’ to be downloaded even if you pass on the rest.

Grade: C+

Classic Rewind: Alabama – ‘High Cotton’

Album Review: Clint Black – ‘On Purpose’

711Wx-StaxL._SX522_In the seven years since we last heard new music from Clint Black (and ten since his last full album), the country music landscape has changed beyond recognition. Last week’s On Purpose is unlikely to garner much love from country radio, but Black’s return is surely something to celebrate for those of us who became castaways during the sea change in commercial tastes.

Black has made good use of his long hiatus. He wrote or co-wrote all of the album’s 14 tracks. The album has reunited him with his longtime co–producer James Stroud and while the final product doesn’t outdo anything that they did in the past, it more than holds it own against Black’s impressive back catalog. Black sounds as energetic and enthusiastic as he did back in 1989, and his voice is as good as ever. There are no huge artistic stretches; the album sounds exactly like something he would have released back in his commercial heyday, and I suspect that most fans will be more than OK with that. Clint was never quite the traditionalist he was given credit for, but his sound was always firmly rooted in country music, with fiddles, steel and harmonica on prominent display. There also was — and still is — a good deal of fancy electric guitar work, but not the heavy-handed arena rock-type that has become all too common in recent years. There is no pandering to current commercial tastes, just vintage Clint Black from start to finish.

Black’s old songwriting partner Hayden Nicholas co-wrote three of the album’s tracks: “Doing It Now For Love”, the catchy “Calling It News” — which laments the same old, same old dominating the headlines, and the excellent poignant ballad “The Last Day”, which finds an elderly couple reminiscing about the past, well aware that time is starting to run out. Frank Rogers co-wrote three tracks, including the current single “Time For That” and the excellent ballad “Breathing Air”, which is a lot more interesting than the title suggests. The tender love ballad is my favorite track on the album.

Steve Wariner shares co-writing credits on two tracks: “One Way to Live” is quite good but “Right on Time” is rather forgettable. The legendary Bill Anderson collaborated with Clint and Bob DiPiero for the album’s sole party song “Beer”, which ought to serve as an example to the bro-country crowd that drinking songs can still have intelligent lyrics. Big & Rich provide the background vocals.

I have a pet peeve about artists who, after long breaks between albums, include a remake of an older song on their comeback collections. I was, therefore, slightly disappointed to see a new version of “You Still Get To Me”, Clint’s 2008 duet with his wife Lisa Hartman Black, on the track listing. It’s bluesier than the original, but it seems like an unnecessary remake. However, the album contains a generous 14 tracks, so it’s a minor complaint at best.

While On Purpose may not break any new ground, it is sure to please Clint’s old fans, who hopefully will support it so it can overcome the inevitable lack of radio support.

Grade: A-

Classic Rewind: Gail Davies – ‘A Love That Could Last’


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