My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers and Ronnie Milsap – ‘Make No Mistake, She’s Mine’

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Classic Rewind: Chris Young covers – ‘Here’s A Quarter Call Someone Who Cares’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘Coward Of The County’

Album Rewind: Kendell Marvel – Lowdown & Lonesome’

Successful songwriter Kendell Marvel’s debut album proves he is a strong singer as well with a booming baritone. The record is in a mainly Outlaw vein with honky tonk and Southern rock elements combining in a way which should appeal to fans of Chris Stapleton. Marvel co-wrote nine of the ten tracks, all with either the aforementioned Stapleton or with his producer Keith Gattis. The songs all focus on heartbreak and drinking.

The title track, written with Gattis and Randy Houser, sets the stage with its passionate and southern rock infused vocal and lyrical nods to Johnny Cash as the narrator treats a broken heart with booze and barroom life. I believe Houser is on backing vocals on the track. ‘Heartache Off My Back’ is another energetic tune about battling heartbreak, set to a train rhythm assisted by Mickey Raphael’s harmonica.

The tender ballad ‘Gypsy Woman’ (officially a single) paints a sympathetic portrait of a restless drifter, but appealing for her return home. In the misleadingly seductive sounding ‘Watch Your Heart’ the protagonist cautions a potential love interest against getting too emotionally involved with him.

There are three co-writes with Stapleton. The best of them is ‘Closer To Hell’ which Gattis also helped write. This is a traditional country drinking song about a man slowly destroying himself after his loved one moves on:

Well, my sweet little baby lit out of here like a bat out of you know where
So I’ve been drinkin’ every day and night til the dog aint got no hair…

Well, my Godfearin mama, bless her heart,
Sent the preacher out to talk to me
Sat on the couch, said “Let it all out,
Son, the truth is gonna set you free”
So I started confessin’
And he started sweating
Til he had to get up and leave
I guess the preacher agrees that

I’m just one more day closer to hell
No, it won’t be long til I’m walking with the Devil himself
I got one foot in the fire
And the other one’s on the way…

Well, they say the road is paved with good intentions
But I don’t intend on doin’ nothin’ good

‘Untangle My Mind’, which the pair wrote with Jaron Boyer, is a mid-paced tune about hard living which is quite enjoyable, loaded with honky tonk piano. ‘Tryin’ Not To Love You’, which they wrote with Casey Beathard, lacks melody, and leans a little more in the southern rock direction. However, this is the only track I didn’t much enjoy.

My favorites on this album are two sad ballads written with Gattis. ‘Hurtin’ Gets Hard’ (also written with Audley Freed) is about missing an ex whenever he is home alone and can’t distract himself any more:

You’d think that I couldn’t care
Til I walk in the front door and you’re still not there
And that’s when it stops being easy
And that’s when it all falls apart
When I’m here and you’re out wherever you are
And that’s when the hurtin’ gets hard

The steel-led ‘That Seat’s Saved’ is about a man in a bar hoping against hope that his love interest will come back.

The album closes on a high with the sole cover, Charlie Daniels’ ‘Drinkin’ My Baby Goodbye’, on which Kendell is joined by Jamey Johnson.

This is a really good album which has a lot to offer.

Grade: A

Classic Rewind: Billy Walker – ‘Cross The Brazos At Waco’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘You Decorated My Life’

Classic Rewind: John Conlee – ‘Backside Of Thirty’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘The Gambler’

Album Review: Kenny Rogers – ‘Kenny’

Kenny followed the crossover success of ‘The Gambler’ with another self-titled album, filled with songs intended to attract the non-country audience. Indeed, listening to most of the record I was hard pressed to hear any country elements at all.

The lead single, ‘You Decorated My Life’, is a pleasant but definitely AC ballad ornamented with a heavy string arrangement. It was another big hit for Kenny, hitting #1 country, #2 Adult and #7 pop. The album’s sole nod to reasonably straight country was a return to the story songs which had been so successful for him before, in the shape of ‘Coward Of The County’. Set to the same rhythm as ‘Lucille’, the somewhat melodramatic story is of a boy who eschews violence after his criminal father dies, until his girlfriend is assaulted. It proved to be an enormous international hit, Kenny’s only #1 other than ‘Lucille’ in the UK (where for some reason ‘The Gambler’ did not chart). It’s not as good, or believable, as ‘Lucille’, but is definitely memorable and the best song on this album.

A couple of other songs are in a country-pop vein. ‘Goodbye Marie’ is a well-written song (by Mel McDaniel and Dennis Linde’ about a man planning on leaving, but with a somewhat cluttered production. It definitely had single potential, and in fact was subsequently a minor hit for Bobby Goldsboro, and Kenny’s version was eventually released as a spoiler single in 1986, after he had moved to a rival label. ‘One Man’s Woman’, written by Kenny’s keyboard player Steve Glassmeyer, is a pretty good cheating song, and is well sung by Kenny, although the strings dominate the arrangement too much for my taste.

The standard ‘Old Folks’ is not country at all, but quite nicely done with a sensitive vocal interpretation, although the keyboard sound is now very dated and there are more strings.
‘I Want To Make You Smile’ is a tender ballad written by Bill Medley of the Righteous Brothers. I like this despite the overbearing strings, apart from a hideous falsetto note or two near the end.

‘Tulsa Turnaround’, which Kenny had previously recorded with The First Edition, is more of a dirty blues rocker which is well done but a bit loud and busy for me. ‘You Turn The Light On’ is very pop with a hard beat, and ‘She’s A Mystery’ is syncopated pop; while ‘Santiago Midnight Moonlight’ and the even more dreadful ‘In And Out Of Your Heart’ are outright disco.

This is not an album I can recommend to country fans.

Grade: D

Classic Rewind: Dwight Yoakam and Patty Loveless – ‘Send A Message To My Heart’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘Love Or Something Like It’

Classic Rewind: Johnny Paycheck – ‘I Sleep With her Memory Every Night’

Album Review: Jason Allen – ‘Here’s To You’

Texan country singer-songwriter Jason Allen offers some reliably traditional country on his latest album. He has a pleasant, warm voice which works well on these songs, all self-written or co-written. as a writer he also has a gift for melody.

The title track is officially a single, and is quite a nice love song but not the most memorable choice on the album. The likeably melodic mid paced ‘Nightmare And A Dream’ is about struggling the memory of a lost love. ‘End Of the Line’ is also pretty good, with another relationship having run its course.

‘Smooth Talkin’ Lady’ is a mellow tune about falling in love; I could imagine George Strait covering this to good effect. ‘Cowboy’s Dream’ is a short (under two minutes) but sweet slice of western swing.

I really liked the gently melancholy ‘Hope It Rains Today’, where the protagonist asks God to stop his loved one from leaving by sending done some bad weather or even an earthquake. The valedictory ‘I’ll Always Be Yours’ offers a way back for the ex.

‘I Dare You To Love’ is a pretty ballad encouraging kindness and goodwill, saying “you already had a loving heart, now use it”. This is a lovely song with a genuinely inspirational message which seems especially toical right now.

You already had a loving heart, now use it

God gave you a great big heart
Don’t waste it
Try to spread it all around
Let’s face it
When it comes to hate in this world
It’s sad but we’ve got enough
I dare you to change it
I dare you to love

Let’s try to change it
I dare you to love

The uptempo novelty ‘Holy Moly Guacamole’ has energy but it’s a bit silly. ‘Villa’s Horse’ is an entertaining western story song about an outlaw who makes off with the early 20th century Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa’s possessions and steals his girlfriend too.

This is a strong album which I liked a good deal.

Grade: A-

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘Sweet Music Man’

Classic Rewind: The Chuck Wagon Gang – ‘Echoes From The Burning Bush’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘Lucille’

Classic Rewind: George Jones – ‘If I Could Put Them All Together’

Classic Rewind: Kenny Rogers – ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Aint Got)?’

Book Review: Freddy Powers and Catherine Powers with Jake Brown – ‘The Spree Of 83’

Freddy Powers, country-jazz musician and songwriter, was an influential figure, not least as sidekick to Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard. The book was started a few years before his death last year aged 84, with the help of his wife Catherine and professional writer Jake Brown.

It is neither biography not autobiography, coming across more as a set of clippings, or the script for a documentary’s voiceovers. Freddy himself, Catherine, and various friends and colleagues from his past (including the late Haggard), are all quoted at length talking about the man and incidents in his life, with each original interview or set of interviews chopped up and scattered through the book, interspersed with reviews of albums and concerts from the press, and the lyrics of many of Powers’ songs. I would have preferred some overarching third (or first) person narrative which would have made it feel more cohesive. (It could also have done with a sharper eye proofreading, as there are a few spelling errors throughout.) There is also a chapter comprising rare photographs, but unfortunately these do not translate well to a kindle reading. However, there are some fascinating anecdotes and the book offers some insight into Haggard at the peak of his career.

The book’s title comes from the period in the early 80s (actually covering several years, not just the 1983 of the title) when Freddy and Haggard lived on adjacent houseboats on Lake Shasta. Both separated or divorced and happy to be single again, they engaged in a hedonistic mix of drugs and sex with an everchanging group of women, while writing songs. It’s probably not the book to read if you want to believe your heroes never have feet of clay, although to be fair everyone involved seems to have had a really good time with no regrets.

This period is not the sole focus of the book, although as an incredibly creative time it does loom quite large in the story. Freddy also talks about his childhood and early career, and about his love story with his last wife Catherine (20 years his junior but very evidently the love of his life). In his last years, when the ravages of Parkinson’s disease stopped him from playing the guitar, he adopted more of a cuddly grandpa persona and served as mentor to young female artists, including Texas artist Pauline Reese and Mary Sarah.

So the content is absorbing; it’s just a shame that it was not better produced with more editorial input.

Grade: B

Classic Rewind: Johnny Duncan and Janie Fricke – ‘Jo And The Cowboy’