My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Classic Rewind: Loretta Lynn – ‘Bargain Basement Dress’

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Classic Rewind: Zac Brown Band – ‘My Old Man’

Classic Rewind: Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Blues – ‘So Blue’

Classic Rewind: Joey + Rory – ‘Hello Love’

Classic Rewind: Dottie West – ‘Leaving’s For Unbelievers’

Classic Rewind: Nanci Griffith – ‘I Wish It Would Rain’

Classic Rewind: Marty Robbins – ‘Am I That Easy To Forget?’

Classic Rewind: Waylon Jennings – ‘Out Of Jail’

Classic Rewind: Larry Gatlin – ‘Help Me’

Classic Rewind: Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton – ‘Her And The Car And The Mobile Home’

Classic Rewind: Janie Fricke – ‘I’ll Need Someone To Hold Me When I Cry’

Classic Rewind: Johnny Horton – ‘Sink The Bismarck’

Album Review: Tim Culpepper – ‘DUI (Drinkin’ Under The Influence)’

I loved Mississippi-born, Alabama-raised Tim Culpepper’s solidly traditional Pourin’ Whiskey On Pain half a dozen years ago, and I was delighted to see he had released a follow-up. This is real country music, sung by a man with a great classic country baritone. The prodiction is solid with fiddle, steel guitar and honky on piano. He wrote most of the songs with his wife Jeanette Marie.

The opener ‘Drove Her Away’ is a regretful look at a relationship killed by the man’s poor choices. ‘Another Way To Try’ is a slow ballad about drinking to soothe the pain of a woman leaving.

‘She Only Loves Me’ is about being the lady’s fallback option when no one else is available.

The best song is the almost-title track, ‘Under The Influence’. This is a wonderful tribute to classic country music:

I love to hear some Haggard
Lord he sounds so good with beer
When that jukebox plays some Jones and Strait
You can always find me here
So put on Whitley’s stuff
I’ll slide my barstool up
And you can pour me a shot that’s strong
Cause I’m under the influence of hardcore country songs

I wanna hear a crying steel guitar
A fiddle and a five piece band
Give me an ice cold brew
Three chords and the truth
About the workin’ and the common man
I’m hooked on tradition
Inebriated by the honky tonks
And I’m under the influence of hardcore country songs

They didn’t sell their soul for fire and smoke just to be superstars
That’s why I love those legends
They stayed true to who they are
So crank up Hank and turn up Vern
Put on Gene and drink along
Cause I’m under the influence of hardcore country songs

There is a cameo appearance by fellow traditionalist Ken Mellons. Fabulous.

The power of music is also a central element to ‘Thirsty’ (which Tim and his wife wrote with Jacob Bryant), where the protagonist takes refuges from a hot day and missing his loved one in a bar room with a jukebox, with Keith Whitley the final resort. Another great song.

In another song Tim personifies the ‘Sad Ole Country Song’, “a reminder of love gone wrong”.

Tim recounts his life in music with a mixture of fondness and wry regret for his lack of stardom, all inspired by ‘Daddy’s Old Guitar’, while he would

Sing my songs to empty barstools for hardly any pay
But I sing them anyway

The final song (a cowrite with Jeff “Hoot” Gibson) addresses the state of both the USA and country music in ‘Take Back Our Country Again’

Jesus and Jack Daniels are in high demand
Politicians try to sell us on their progressive plans

They force feed us music on our radio
Killin’ tradition down on Music Row
While they’re gaining ground we’re losing control
Bring on the fiddle, a little misery and gin
And let’s take back our country again

There is some particularly lovely fiddle on this track.

My only regrets about this record are that there are only eight tracks and hat it’s been so long in the making.

Grade: A

Classic Rewind: Don Williams – ‘The Ties That Bind’

Classic Rewind: Gene Watson – ‘You’re Out Doing What I’m Here Doing Without’

Classic Rewind: Teea Goans – ‘What A Friend We Have In Jesus’

Classic Rewind: Patty Loveless – ‘Dreaming My Dreams With You’

Classic Rewind: Dottie West and Steve Wariner – ‘Rings Of Gold’

Classic Rewind: Pam Tillis – ‘Don’t Tell Me What To Do’

Album Review: Chalee Tennison – ‘Parading In The Rain’

Chalee’s tenure with Asylum having come to an end, another label decided to give her a chance, and she moved to James Stroud’s Dreamworks. Artistically, it resulted in her finest work, largely inspired by her own most recent divorce; but commercially it was a disaster.

The lead single, ‘Lonesome Road’, was the only single to chart, and t peaked at #54. Written by Bryan Simpson, Ashley Gorley and Melissa Peirce, it has a Celtic country-rock feel, and is an energetically delivered song about surviving against the odds.

Chalee didn’t write her next single, Phillip and Amber Leigh White did, but it feels like a very personal one. ‘Easy Lovin’ You’ is a tender ballad addressed to her daughter, recalling the difficulties and sacrifices of teenage motherhood, and the rewards:

The best thing that I ever did
At the time was my worst mistake
17 and just a kid
I was 17 when I threw my childhood away
For a hazel eyed quarterback

Senior year and 8 months pregnant
I never felt so fat
Wishin’ I could go to prom
But they don’t make dresses for girls like that…

Looking back it was hard lovin’ me
But it’s easy lovin’ you

Chalee’s eldest daughter Tiffany provides harmony vocals on this deeply moving track, which regrettably failed to chart.

The last attempt at a single was the album’s title track, written by Kris Bergsnes and Bobby Pinson. It is an upbeat tune with an optimistic lyric about positivity and making the most of a situation. The lyric is a bit bland, but Chalee’s delivery is infectious on a song I could imagine as a hit for an artist like Jo Dee Messina.

Chalee co-wrote three songs on the record. ‘I Am Love’ (written with Kendall Marvel and Phil O’Donnell) is quite good. ‘Believe’, written with Kelly Garrett, is pleasant and optimistic, if a little clichéd and rather poppy. By far the best of Chalee’s songs is ‘The Mind Of This Woman’, a co-write with Dean Dillon. This is an excellent closely observed depiction of a woman stuck in an unsatisfactory life.

‘I Am Pretty’, written by Buffy Lawson and Eric Pittarelli, is a sensitive story song about a woman rediscovering her dignity and making the decision to leave an abusive husband. It is one of the strongest tracks on the record.

‘Cheater’s Road’, written by Jason Sellers and Sharon Rice, is another story song, about a rich man’s neglected wife finding passion in an extra-marital affair:

She’d rather have him than an empty bed and her self-respect

‘Me And Mexico’, written by Mark Narmore and Liz Rose, is an up-tempo song about adapting well to a breakup by going on vacation. ‘More To This Than That’, written by Gary Burr and Carolyn Dawn Johnson, is a fine ballad about the a couple dividing up their possessions as they split. The record closes with Leslie Satcher’s ‘Peace’, a thoughtful song about people in desperate need of God.

This album is definitely on the contemporary side of modern country, but it is very well performed. It’s a shame it did not do better, as it seems to have had commercial potential.

Grade: B+