My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Album Review: Ralph Stanley & Ralph Stanley II – ‘Side By Side’

side by sideIt’s hard to know how much longer the legendary Ralph Stanley can keep on making music.  He is supported here by son Ralph II on a project intended to recall the best of the music Ralph made with late brother Carter as the Stanley Brothers.  Father and son take turns singing lead and harmony. Ralph’s ageing voice still has great presence and character, while his son’s has its own arresting quality.

A solo accappella performance by Ralph senior on ‘Don’t Weep For Me’ makes a virtue of his ageing voice and shows his sense of phrasing is unaffected.  He sounds good on the traditional ‘I’ve Still Got 99’, and is effective on the intensely lonesome wail of ‘Carolina Mountain Home’, in which the protagonist longs for his sweetheart.  Another traditional tune, ‘Wild Bill Jones’ represents the timeless sound of the music of the Appalachians.

The prettily melodic ‘Walking With You In My Dreams’ was written by Bill Monroe’s brother Charlie.  Ralph sings this one simply, with no harmonies behind him.

Ralph II delivers a measured lead on the pensive ‘Dirty Black Coal’, a song written by his father about miners’ mixed emotions about the dangerous and unpleasant work which nonetheless provides a living for their families.  John Rigsby’s fiddle underlines the mood set by II’s mournful vocal.  A version of  his father’s ‘A Little At A Time’ is good but less memorable than other tracks.

He is ideally suited to the plaintive ‘Don’t Step Over An Old Love’, familiar to country fans from Ricky Skaggs’ version.  This is perhaps my favourite track, followed by the melancholy gospel ‘Nobody Answered Me’.

Ralph II sings solo on the rapid paced banjo-driven Carter Family classic ‘Darling Little Joe’, and is supported by his father’s high harmony on the traditional ‘Six Months Ain’t Long’ and the newly written but very traditional sounding ‘White And Pink Flowers’.  II also takes the lead on a solid bluegrass version of Ernest Tubb’s ‘Are You Waiting Just for Me’.

One instrumental, ‘battle Ax’, is thrown in.

This is a rare link to the deep past of country and bluegrass, beautifully performed with the benefits of modern recording technology to keep the sound clear and pure.

Grade: A

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