My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Wade Hayes

Album Review: Wade Hayes – ‘Old Country Song’

The latest album from 90s star and cancer survivor Wade Hayes shows he is still in possession of a great traditional country voice. He and co-producer Dave McAfee have found some excellent songs.

The opening ‘Can’t Get Close Enough To You’ is a sultry love song addressed to the protagonist’s wife of many years, and is one of four songs on the album written by Hayes, all loosely on the theme of marriage. Of the others, The nostalgic ‘Full Moon Summer Night’ is sung with passion, but is not all that interesting a song. The pace is increased with the wry up-tempo ‘I Wish I Still Drank’, which reflects on the contrast between a wild youth and a sober happy married life. The last of Wade’s own songs, ‘She Knows Me’, is a grateful commentary on his relationship with his wife:
She knows me and she loves me anyway

There are a couple of classic covers: a faithful remake of the Conway Twitty hit ‘Julia’, with an emotional vocal. Haggard’s ‘Going Where The Lonely Go’ works perfectly for Wade, and is a highlight. Wade’s love for real country music is also reflected in the title tune, a lovely Roger Springer-penned song about the power of music:

I’m as old as time
Born in a poet’s mind
I can reach across the ocean and hit the mark
Be an answered prayer to a broken heart
And I can go on and on and on about life
Talk about love
I can philosophize
Make a woman cry
Stop a man in his tracks and send him on back home
I’m just an old country song

I started out in a freight car to the rhythm of the track
One night I was left unfinished in the back of a Cadillac
Spent some time at Folsom …
And for a little while those men were free

Springer also wrote (with Tim Menzies) ‘I Don’t Understand’, an entertaining Western Swing number about the complexity of love which was previously recorded by Springer’s own band, the Roger Springer Band.

Jon Randall, Jessi Alexander and Phillip White wrote ‘What You Need From Me’, a beautiful duet with Megan Mullins about friendship and unrequited love, which was previously cut by Shelley Skidmore and Greg Bates. ‘Needed The Rain’ is a strong Chris Stapleton song.

The album closes with a tastefully stripped down and sincerely delivered version of the hymn ‘In Christ Alone’.

This is an excellent album, and I strongly recommend it.

Grade: A

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Classic Rewind: Wade Hayes – ‘The Day That She Left Tulsa’

Album Review: Wade Hayes – ‘Go Live Your Life’

go live your lifeCancer survivor Wade Hayes has released his first project since announcing his recovery.

The title track draws on his experiences facing mortality, and is a fine song about seizing the moment, but the production, while not overwhelming, is a bit heavy handed in places for my liking. Bookending the album is the similarly themed ‘If the Sun Comes Up’, in which Wade contemplates the reaction of his loved ones if he died.

‘Love Knew Better’ is potentially rather charming, but a tune and arrangement very reminiscent of the McCarters’ 1989 hit ‘Up And Gone’ are smothered by the mix – as are the lyrics, which seem to tell the story of a thwarted wedding.

The production is also slightly too loud on ballad ‘She Is Home’, a sweet tribute to the protagonist’s wife, but it is saved by a nice sincere vocal. ‘Here And Her’ is a sad and pretty ballad about coping in the aftermath of a broken heart, but once more a more striped down production would have let it shine more. ‘Wrecking Ball’ is just not very interesting.

Much better, ‘Bluebonnet Blues’ has a lovely old fashioned slow western swing feel, while ‘Let You Go’ is a beautiful lost love ballad with a relatively restrained arrangement.

Another highlights is the amusing ‘Remember The Alimony’, which as the title suggest is a jaundiced warning against repeat attempts at marriage:

Once upon a time she was Mrs Right
Then she took all you had

Remember the alimony
The high cost of matrimony
Before you plan another ceremony

‘Old Dirt Road’ is a lovely memory of a rural childhood the protagonist was all too keen to leave behind, but views in a different light with mature eyes.

There are some good songs here, and Wade is in good voice, but the production is too often heavy handed and obtrusive.

Grade: B-

Week ending 3/7/15: #1 singles this week in country music history

wadehayes09-280x2101955 (Sales): In The Jailhouse Now — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Jukebox): In The Jailhouse Now — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Disc Jockeys): In The Jailhouse Now — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1965: I’ve Got A Tiger By The Tail — Buck Owens (Capitol)

1975: It’s Time To Pay The Fiddler – Cal Smith (MCA)

1985: Baby Bye-Bye — Gary Morris (Warner Bros.)

1995: Old Enough To Know Better — Wade Hayes (Columbia)

2005: Bless The Broken Road — Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)

2015: Take Your Time — Sam Hunt (MCA)

2015 (Airplay): Make Me Wanna — Thomas Rhett (Valory)

Week ending 2/28/15: #1 singles this week in country music history

mel-mcdaniel-200-0707091955 (Sales): In The Jailhouse Now — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Jukebox): More and More — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1955 (Disc Jockeys): Loose Talk — Carl Smith (Columbia)

1965: I’ve Got A Tiger By The Tail — Buck Owens (Capitol)

1975: I Care/Sneaky Snake — Tom T. Hall (Mercury)

1985: Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On — Mel McDaniel (Capitol)

1995: Old Enough To Know Better — Wade Hayes (Columbia)

2005: Bless The Broken Road — Rascal Flatts (Lyric Street)

2015: Take Your Time — Sam Hunt (MCA)

2015 (Airplay): Sun Daze — Florida Georgia Line (Republic Nashville)

Album Review: Wade Hayes – ‘Place To Turn Around’

Place To Turn AroundWade Hayes was one of the more underrated of the 90s neotraditionalists, scoring only six top 10 hits in his career. I always liked his melancholy-tinged voice, and I was pleased to find he has released his first album in nine years. It’s very much an independent effort, with Wade writing or co-writing almost all the material and playing acoustic and electric guitar, and Wade has released it himself.

It opens a little disappointingly with ‘Good Day To Go Crazy’. The song itself (co-written with Jerry Salley and Jenny Farrell, both of whom contribute backing vocals on the album) is fine, as the protagonist suggests he and his woman take a break from everyday life, but Wade’s voice is too low in the mix. Luckily, things pick up immediately with the charming ‘The Best Part’, written with Michael White and Carson Chamberlain, although the production is a bit heavier-handed than I would like. Wade offers some cogent advice from his father in the aftermath of a failed marriage:

“Something special grows when two people know
They won’t run when things get hard
If you only want the good time
You’re gonna miss the best part.”

White also worked with Wade on the despairing plea to God, ‘What’s A Broken Heart To You’, which I really like, although I would have preferred a more stripped-down production without the electric guitar solo. Better-sounding, although breaking no new ground lyrically, is the tender ‘God Made Me (To Love You)’, which Wade wrote with Trent Jeffcoat and Roger Springer. Springer also wrote (with Ward Davis and Wade) the bouncy ‘Right Where I Want You’ as a former commitment-phobe gets well and truly caught by a woman “smart enough for the both of us”, who has got him “right where I want you all the time”. Equally entertaining is the cheery western swing of ‘Every Time I Give The Devil A Ride’, written with Jerry Salley and Jim McBride, with its metaphorical look at giving in to temptation.

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