My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Tom Pick

Album Review: Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton – ‘Say Forever You’ll Be Mine’

say forever you'll be mineThe duo’s 12th album, and the last before Dolly and Porter parted ways, was released in 1975.

The title track, the sole single, reached #5 on the Billboard country chart. It is one of the pair’s finest recordings vocally, a beautiful love song (one of four written by Dolly) with a faintly melancholy air to the vocals. A choir backing is perhaps a little too saccharine, but the duo’s harmonies are among their very best collaborations.

Even better is another Dolly-penned tune, ‘Something To Reach For’. This is a classic cheating song about desperation and loneliness, and being with the wrong person as a poor substitute. A great song, with an outstanding vocal from Dolly, although Porter’s solo verse isn’t quite as good. ‘I Have No Right To Care’ is an emotional statement of forbidden love, and another excellent song.

The delicate ‘The Beginning’ traces a relationship from the overwhelming delight of first falling in love, through the challenges of time and poverty, leading to “anger and regret”. The joy of parenthood then brings them back together and revives their love.

Porter wrote ‘Again’, which is quite good, about an on-off relationship. The brisk mid-tempo ‘How Can I (Help You To Forgive Me)’ is a Wagoner co-write with Tom Pick, and quite pleasant if very short (under two minutes).

Porter and Dolly co-wrote the philosophical ‘Life Rides The Train’ set to rail rhythms and a harmonica-train whistle. Dolly’s brother Randy contributed the pleasant ‘If You Were Mine’.

Frank Dycus and Al Gore co-wrote the two remaining songs. ‘Our Love’ is an earnest love song with a stately fiddle intro. ‘Love To See Us Through’ has more substance; this is a cheerful song about a couple struggling through hard times.

This is a strong album, but it is notable that the best songs are the ones Dolly wrote, and her vocals clearly outshine Porter’s. One can see why she was feeling restless as the “junior” partner in the duo, and wanted to take the spotlight solo.

Grade: A

Album Review: Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton – ‘ Porter ‘n’ Dolly’

1708613Porter and Dolly’s eleventh collection of duets is predominately comprised of songs they wrote themselves — unlike many of their earlier efforts which relied to one extent or another on cover versions of other artists’ hits. One or the other or both are listed as the composers, with only one track “Sixteen Years” — a Wagoner co-write with Tom Pick — relying on any outside songwriters. As usual, Bob Ferguson is the credited producer.

The album is capped by two Wagoner-Parton compositions. The opening track and sole single “Please Don’t Stop Loving Me” was their only duet to reach the #1 spot in Billboard. The very pretty closing track “Sounds of Nature” has a stripped-down folk feel to it.

Porter’s solo composition “The Power of Love” is the album’s weakest track, but he redeems himself nicely on “Sixteen Years” (a collaboration with Tom Pick as noted earlier), which finds a couple about to go their separate ways after a sixteen-year marriage.

The remainder of album’s songs were written by Dolly and all of them are enjoyable. They are, for the most part, positive and upbeat — no heart-wrenching ballads about dying children or beyond-help alcoholics. Even the album’s saddest songs “Without You” and “Two” are rather subdued and devoid of any attempts at emotional manipulation. The pair seems to be largely ab-libbing — and having a great time doing so — on the light-hearted and upbeat “We’d Have To Be Crazy”. Dolly would revisit “The Fire That Keeps You Warm” two years later for her solo project All I Can Be and “Together You and I” would be recorded again for her 2011 album Better Day.

Like all of the prior Wagoner-Parton albums, Porter ‘n’Dolly is strictly a traditional affair that relies heavily on their wonderful harmonies and some excellent steel guitar work. It is not currently commercially available, but all of its tracks can be found on the Bear Family box set Just Between You and Me.

Grade: A

Album Review: Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton – ‘Love And Music’

love and musicLove And Music was the tenth duet album by Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton. Released in July 1973, only one single was released from the album, a cover of a Carl Smith oldie from 1951, “If Teardrops Were Pennies”, a song which Carl took to #8, but Porter and Dolly took to #3. As always, Bob Ferguson is listed as the producer.

The album opens up with “If Teardrops Were Pennies”. I don’t happen to own a vinyl copy of this album, but I’ve seen it and if I recall correctly Carl Butler, who wrote this song, also wrote the liner notes to this album. The song is a mid-tempo romp that Porter & Dolly do very well indeed, although I also like Carl Smith’s version of the song and the recordings that Carl & Pearl Butler made of the song.

If teardrops were pennies and heartaches were gold
I’d have all the treasures my pockets would hold
I’d be oh so wealthy with treasures untold
If teardrops were pennies and heartaches were gold

An acre of diamonds I’d offer to you
A solid gold mansion, an airplane or two
This whole world would be yours to have and to hold
If teardrops were pennies and heartaches were gold

Next up is the first of four Porter Wagoner tunes on the album “Sounds of Night” a gentle ballad with a nice fiddle intro by Mack Magaha. The song describes the lonely sounds of night (whippoorwills, church bells) and how they translate to human emotions

I don’t know much about Howard Tuck, other than what I found in his obituary (http://www.mywebtimes.com/obituaries/howard-red-tuck/article_e67fea9d-9ee8-5b24-8d2c-e7e5cf4e0300.html ) but his song “Laugh The Years Away” is a good song that would have made a good single. The song is a humorous look at married life, happy even if not blessed with material wealth.

A corporation owns the factory I work in
Someone else owns the house we call our home
The bank owns the car we drive around
And we’ve got something we can call our own

We’ve got love happiness surrounds us
And we thank the Lord for every single day
And with love we’ll always have each other
And together we can laugh the years away

Next up is the first of four Dolly Parton tunes on this album “You”, a rather bland ballad of domestic bliss.

Porter’s “Wasting Love” also would have made a good single, an up-tempo song about a couple growing apart. While the lyrics are good, the strength of the song is the melody.

“Come To Me” is a slow, serious ballad, that essentially finds Porter and Dolly trading verses. The song is inspirational without being religious. The song had no potential as a single, but it is a nice song.

Porter co-wrote “Love Is Out Tonight” with Tom Pick. The song is a slow ballad with very vivid imagery.

As blue skies and daylight darken into night
Surrounding us with beauty as the stars make their light
They spell out our names all the stars up above
As they flicker and shine like letters of love

Then a warm breath of air whispers through the trees
As the leaves on their branches have blown to the breeze
Ripples of water seemed to echo the sound
Love’s out tonight there’s love all around

Small drops of dew act as nature’s perfume
Placing its fragrance on all that’s in blue
While I hold you so close your lips touching mine
With nature all around us watching our love entwine

Porter Wagoner penned “In The Presence of You”. The song features a nice piano intro to a slow ballad of a people who cannot find the right words to say to each other, although they love each other deeply.

In the presence of you I wonder
Why I can’t say the things that I want to
All the pretty words that I planned to say when I’m with you
I lose them in the presence of you

Your nearness makes my voice tremble
There’s a weakness that I feel through and through
Searching for words to describe how I love you
Don’t come easy in the presence of you

Dolly penned “I Get Lonesome By Myself”, another of Dolly’s lonesome little girl songs. In this song the narrator stumbles across the daughter he abandoned a few years back. Dolly’s part is spoken in a somewhat creepy effort at a six year old girl’s voice.

The album closes with the forth Dolly Parton composition “There Will Always Be Music”, a nice capstone to the album.

As the farmer works the fields he sings a song
The songbirds in the trees sing along
And the wind makes melodies as it whistles through the trees
Man’s burdens are made lighter with a song

There’ll always be music as long as there’s a story to be told
There’ll always be music cause music is the voice of the song
There’ll always be music

Dolly Parton has a well deserved reputation as a songwriter, but Porter was no slouch either, although neither Porter nor Dolly would rank up there with Cindy Walker, Dallas Frazier, Harlan Howard or Hank Cochran. On this album at least, Porter’s songs are stronger than Dolly’s.

This is a pretty decent album, although not necessarily one of their better albums. As Jonathan Pappalardo noted in his excellent review of The Right Combination/Burning The Midnight Oil, “[w]hile none of these songs have truly amounted to anything, they combine to make a fine collection on their own”.

My feelings exactly – B+