My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

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Album Review: Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton – ‘Just The Two of Us’

R-6803309-1426956528-3477.jpegThe album opens up with “Closer By The Hour”, a song about a relationship moving towards its inevitable consummation. The song is a jog-along ballad written by Al Gore (not the same Al Gore as either of the two Tennessee hack politicos of yesteryear).

Next up is an outstanding version of Tom T. Hall’s “I Washed My Face In The Morning Dew”, This song was Tom T’s first charted single as a singer, reaching #30 in 1967. I think Porter & Dolly missed a bet in not releasing this as a single.

“Jeannie’s Afraid of the Dark” is one of those morbid dead child ballads that Dolly excelled in writing. The song was the B-side of “We’ll Get Ahead Someday” but was sufficiently popular that it charted separately at #51 in late 1968 (Record World had it reach #31).

Her two little feet would come running into
Our bedroom almost every night
Her soft little face would be wet from her tears
And her little heart pounding with fright
She’d hold out her arms, then she’d climb in beside us
In her small voice, we’d hear her remark
“Mommie and Daddy, can I sleep here with you
‘Cause Jeannie’s afraid of the dark”

Jerry Chesnut’s “Holding On To Nothin’”was the second Porter & Dolly single released, and the first single from this album. Released in April 1968, the single spent 16 weeks on the charts reaching a peak of #17. The song is a mid-tempo ballad about what happens when the flame burns out.

Oh, why do we keep holding on with nothin’ left to hold on to

Let’s be honest with each other that’s at least that we can do

I feel guilty when they envy me and you

We’re holding on with nothin’ left to hold on to

Curly Putman’s “Slip Away Today” is a bit more introspective than many of the pair’s songs, sort of in the vein of Carl & Pearl Butler’s “Don’t Let Me Cross Over”. It is a good song but not one with any real potential as a single.

“The Dark End of the Street” by Dan Penn and Chips Moman, is a song about slipping around and trying to keep it secret by stealing away at the dark end of the street.

At the time this album was released Jerry Chesnut was one of Nashville’s leading songsmiths. The next tow songs “Just The Two of Us” and “Afraid To Love Again” are both nice ballads well suited to Porter and Dolly’s vocal harmonies.

Mack Magaha, the fiddler in Porter’s Wagonmasters and before that in Don Reno & Red Smiley’s Tennessee Cutups , isn’t normally thought of as a songwriter, but he did some song writing with both Reno & Smiley and Porter & Dolly recording his songs. Mack’s “We’ll Get Ahead Someday” is a humorous up-tempo song that was the lead single from the album reaching #5.

The paper says there’s a sale downtown I gotta have some money today

Well there’s things at home that’s never been used you bought last bargain day

Well you go out one Saturday night just spend too much money on wine

Well I work hard all week long and I gotta have a little fun sometimes

We’ll get ahead someday…

If the sun comes up and my wife cuts down we’ll get ahead someday

Even in 1967, Merle Haggard’s songs were in great demand, and Porter and Dolly latched onto a good one in “Somewhere Between”, one of many Haggard compositions that the Hag never got around to releasing as a single (many years later Suzy Bogguss released it as a single). It works well as a duet for Porter and Dolly.

Somewhere between your heart and mine

There’s a window, I can’t see through
 T
here’s a wall so high, it reaches the sky

Somewhere between me and you

I love you so much, I can’t let you go

And sometimes I believe you love me

But somewhere between your heart and mine

There’s a door without any key


The album closes with a pair of Dolly Parton compositions in “The Party” and “I Can”. “The Party” is another one of those morbid ballads that Dolly seemed to crank out so easily. The highlight of the song is Porter’s narration:

The party started out wild and it grew wilder as the night wore on

With drinking laughing teling dirty jokes nobody thinkin’ of home

Then the stranger feeling came over me and it chilled me to the bones

And I told my wife that we’d better leave the party

Cause I felt that we were needed at home

As we rode along I got to thinking of how the kids that mornin’

Had asked if we would take them to church the next day

And how I’d put ’em off like I’d so often done

By sayin’ we’d probably get home too late

Then my thoughts were interrupted by the sound of sirens

As they cut through the still night air
 Then we turned down our street that’s when we saw the fire

The rest was like a nightmare 

We took their little bodies to church the next day

Though we’d left the party early we still got home too late

“I Can” has the feel of folk music. Both of these two Dolly Parton compositions are good album tracks.

Porter and Dolly would record stronger albums as far as song quality is concerned, but of more importance than that was that this early in the game, they had their vocal style down pat. The production on the album sounds like Porter’s solo albums, but that’s a good thing.

Tracks
01. “Closer by the Hour” Al Gore 2:15
02. “I Washed My Face in the Morning Dew” Tom T. Hall 2:45
03. “Jeannie’s Afraid of the Dark” Dolly Parton 2:44
04. “Holding On to Nothin'” Jerry Chesnut 2:26
05. “Slip Away Today” Curly Putman 2:37
06. “The Dark End of the Street” Dan Penn, Chips Moman 2:15
07. “Just the Two of Us” Jerry Chesnut 2:36
08. “Afraid to Love Again” Jerry Chesnut, Theresa Beaty 1:53
09. “We’ll Get Ahead Someday” Mack Magaha 1:55
10. “Somewhere Between” Merle Haggard 2:13
11. “The Party” Dolly Parton 2:54
12. “I Can” Dolly Parton 2:06