My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Steve Holy

Week ending 9/24/16: #1 singles this week in country music history

steve-holy-countrymusicislove1956 (Sales): Crazy Arms — Ray Price (Columbia)

1956 (Jukebox): Hound Dog/Don’t Be Cruel — Elvis Presley (RCA)

1956 (Disc Jockeys):Crazy Arms — Ray Price (Columbia)

1966: Almost Persuaded — David Houston (Epic)

1976: I Don’t Want to Have to Marry You — Jim Ed Brown & Helen Cornelius (RCA)

1986: Got My Heart Set on You — John Conlee (Columbia)

1996: So Much For Pretending — Bryan White (Asylum)

2006: Brand New Girlfriend — Steve Holy (Curb)

2016: Peter Pan — Kelsea Ballerini (Black River)

2016 (Airplay): Peter Pan — Kelsea Ballerini (Black River)

Album Review: Dierks Bentley – ‘Riser’

riserOf today’s current crop of artists, Dierks Bentley is one of the few who at least tries to get it right. Much of the time he succeeds, though occasionally his projects fall short of expectations. Unfortunately, his latest effort Riser, which was released last month falls mostly into the latter category. If you like your country arena-rock style, then you’ll probably enjoy this album, but if you think country music should actually sound country, you’ll likely be disappointed.

Riser was produced by singer-songwriter Ross Copperman. Though he has dabbled in country music from time to time — he co-wrote “Tip It On Back” (one of my least favorite Dierks Bentley singles) as well as songs for Steve Holy and Jennette McCurdy — Cooperman is best known for songs like “All She Wrote”, which was a 2007 pop hit in the UK and “Holding On And Letting Go”, which was featured in the television series The Vampire Diaries. Not surprisingly, bringing in a producer from outside the genre has resulted in one of Dierks’ least country-sounding albums.

Things get off to a decent start with “Bourbon In Kentucky”, the album’s lead single featuring background vocals from Kacey Musgreaves. Surprisingly, the record stalled at #40. The current single “I Hold On”, which Bentley wrote with Brett James, has fared much better. It currently resides at #3 on the charts, but it’s not particularly memorable.

Though not in alignment with my tastes, Riser is at least several notches above the usual dreck heard on country radio today, and it does contain some substantive songs. “Here on Earth” was inspired by the death of Dierks’ father and the 2012 Sandy Hooks school shootings in Connecticut, and “Damn These Dreams”, about trying to juggle competing priorites is well written. But I am bored to distraction with arena rock laced with a bit of banjo and steel guitar so people will think it’s country.

I became more and more disillusioned with this album with each passing track, when I was pleasantly surprised by the very last one — “Hurt Somebody”, which — surprise! actually sounds country and even contains a bit of fiddle and background vocals by Chris Stapleton, whose gravelly voice complements Dierks’ nicely. “Hurt Somebody” is the album’s one truly great song. Download it along with “Bourbon In Kentucky” and “Here on Earth” and skip the rest.

Grade: C

Week ending 3/3/12: #1 singles this week in country music history

1952: Wondering — Webb Pierce (Decca)

1962: Walk On By — Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury)

1972: It’s Four In The Morning — Faron Young (Mercury)

1982: Lord, I Hope This Day Is Good — Don Williams (MCA)

1992: What She’s Doing Now — Garth Brooks (Capitol)

2002: Good Morning Beautiful — Steve Holy (Curb)

2012: You Gonna Fly — Keith Urban (Capitol)

Week ending 2/25/12: #1 singles this week in country music history

1952: Give Me More, More, More of Your Kisses — Lefty Frizzell (Columbia)

1962: Walk On By — Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury)

1972: It’s Four In The Morning — Faron Young (Mercury)

1982: Only One You — T.G. Sheppard (Warner Bros./Curb)

1992: What She’s Doing Now — Garth Brooks (Capitol)

2002: Good Morning Beautiful — Steve Holy (Curb)

2012: All Your Life — The Band Perry (Republic Nashville)

Week ending 2/18/12: #1 singles this week in country music history

1952: Give Me More, More, More of Your Kisses — Lefty Frizzell (Columbia)

1962: Walk On By — Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury)

1972: One’s On The Way — Loretta Lynn (Decca)

1982: Someone Could Lose A Heart Tonight — Eddie Rabbitt (Elektra)

1992: What She’s Doing Now — Garth Brooks (Capitol)

2002: Good Morning Beautiful — Steve Holy (Curb)

2012: All Your Life — The Band Perry (Republic Nashville)

Week ending 2/11/12: #1 singles this week in country music history

1952: Give Me More, More, More of Your Kisses — Lefty Frizzell (Columbia)

1962: Walk On By — Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury)

1972: One’s On The Way — Loretta Lynn (Decca)

1982: Lonely Nights — Mickey Gilley (Epic)

1992: A Jukebox With a Country Song — Doug Stone (Epic)

2002: Good Morning Beautiful — Steve Holy (Curb)

2012: You — Chris Young (RCA)

Week ending 2/4/12: #1 singles this week in country music history

1952: Give Me More, More, More of Your Kisses — Lefty Frizzell (Columbia)

1962: Walk On By — Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury)

1972: Carolyn — Merle Haggard (Capitol)

1982: The Sweetest Thing (I’ve Ever Known) — Juice Newton (Capitol)

1992: A Jukebox With a Country Song — Doug Stone (Epic)

2002: Good Morning Beautiful — Steve Holy (Curb)

2012: I Don’t Want This Night to End — Luke Bryan (Capitol)

Country Singles Chart Summary – 12/17/08

billboard1Yuletide offerings still dot the lower rungs of the Hot Country Songs chart this week, Montgomery Gentry holds steady to the top spot, Carrie Underwood has the Hot Shot Debut, and nothing much changes at the top of the heap.

Steve Holy enters the chart at #60 with ‘What Might Have Been’ and Faith Hill’s ‘Little Drummer Boy’ beats its way in at #59, while Josh Gracin bows at #58 with ‘Telluride’. The Hot Shot Debut of the week is Carrie Underwood with ‘Hark! The Herald Angels Sing’ settling at #54. Sarah Buxton’s ‘Space’ holds its #38 position while still gaining spins. Joey + Rory move up one more spot to #32 with ‘Cheater, Cheater’ while Miranda Lambert ascends 2 to the #26 position with ‘More Like Her’. Also making moves are Taylor Swift’s ‘White Horse’, sprinting to #20, up 6 spots – she is once again the Most Added and has the Most Increased Audience, for the second week.

Lee Ann Womack, meanwhile, falls 3 spots to #23 this week. Brooks & Dunn featuring Reba on ‘Cowgirls Don’t Cry’ also falls 2 spots to #15, but is still increasing in spins and audience. Lady Antebellum’s ‘Lookin’ For A Good Time’ falls one slot to #12, switching places with Blake Shelton’s ‘She Wouldn’t Be Gone’.

Jamey Johnson holds steady to his #10 position – still increasing in spins too. ‘Feel That Fire’, the new tune from Dierks Bentley drops to #9 as it trades with Billy Currington’s ‘Don’t’ – which rises to #8. Alan Jackson’s ‘Country Boy’ holds onto the #7 ranking, and Tim McGraw falls 3 to land at #6 with his latest top 5, ‘Let It Go’. Brad Paisley with Keith Urban go top 5 this week with ‘Start A Band’. Sugarland is still on the rise with ‘Already Gone’, keeping its #4 place. ‘Chicken Fried’ falls one spot to #3 while Rascal Flatts jump 3 positions to #2 with ‘Here’. And Montgomery Gentry rolls into the #1 spot for the second week with ‘Roll With Me’, their second straight chart-topper from their Back When I Knew It All album.

See the entire chart here.