My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: O. B. McClinton

Album Review: Gene Watson – ‘Memories To Burn’

memories to burnIn 1985 Gene moved from MCA to Epic, and recorded Memories To Burn, which he produced with band member Larry Booth. Lead single ‘Cold Summer Day In Georgia’ was a modest hit, peaking at #24. It is a good song in which a man ponders a breakup and the unlikelihood of his woman coming back.

The Western Swing title track did much better, reaching the top 5. It is a slightly anxious message to a new love interest the protagonist hopes will workout better than his past experiences.

The final single, ‘Carmen’, was rather atypical of Gene’s style, and peaked just outside the top 30. It did make a bit of a splash among country fans overseas, after he performed the Spanish-style tune at the Wembley International Country Music Festival. It is quite a pretty plaintive ballad about a roving cowboy from the US falling for a Mexican girl.

‘The Note’ is a stunning lost love ballad which was to be a top 30 single a decade later for neotraditionalist Daryle Singletary. The best song on the album, it is perfect for Gene, and should probably have been a single. The vocal rivals his classic ‘Farewell Party’.

‘Speak Of The Devil’ is another fine ballad and great performance about dealing with a breakup. The protagonist is struggling to get over a really bad relationship with the help of his friendly neighbourhood bar, and it only gets worse when she turns up:

The songs on the jukebox tell of cheating and sin
Speak of the devil – and she walks in

In ‘Stranger In Our House Tonight’ (another great ballad), the protagonist has just heard his wife plans to leave, and is completely blindsided. In ‘New York Times’ (written by African American country singer O. B. McClinton) he is searching for his runaway wife who prefers city lights to a rural Texas home.

The up-tempo ‘I Want My Rib Back’ is a jaundiced number about an unhappily married man co-written by Keith Whitley and later recorded by Kenny Chesney. The call-and-response backing vocals (also making an appearance on the closing ‘Get along Little Doggie’) are a bit dated, but otherwise this is an entertaining performance.

On a happier note, ‘If I Painted A Picture’ is a romantic love song laden with fiddle.

This album is available on a 2-4-1 CD, paired with its successor Starting New Memories (also a great album – I particularly like the story song ‘Atlanta Anymore’ which has a nice twist in its tale of the end of an affair). It is highly recommended.

Grade: A

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Favorite country songs of the 1970s: Part 4

For part four of this series, I’ll be using the same criteria as before – just some songs I liked, one song per artist (although I will feel free to comment on other songs by the artist). This part stops in the middle of the letter M.

“Joy To The World” – Murray Kellum (1971)

A nice country cover of a #1 pop hit for Three Dog Night, this reached #26 and was Murray’s biggest hit. He died in a plane crash in 1990 at the too-young age of 47. Hoyt Axton wrote this song.

Honky Tonk Wine” – Wayne Kemp (1973)

Wayne Kemp was better known as a songwriter who penned major hits for the likes of George Jones (“Love Bug”), Conway Twitty (“The Image of Me”) and countless others. This song reached #17, and was Wayne’s biggest hit.

Sweet Desire” – The Kendalls (1978)

A father and daughter duo, Jeannie took on most of the lead vocals while father Royce sang harmony. The Kendalls kept the radio airwaves safe for real country music during the middle and late 1970s. I liked everything the Kendalls ever sang, and have no idea why the new traditionalist movement of 1986 failed to re-ignite their career.

Mama’s Got The Know-How” – Doug Kershaw (1974)

For someone as famous as he is, Doug Kershaw had only seven chart hits as a solo act, to go with his five hits as part of Rusty & Doug. This one got to #77, a fairly normal placing for his solo efforts. Although I liked this song, his Warner Brothers albums of the 1970s were mostly laconic efforts. Read more of this post