My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Micky Braun

Album Review: Courtney Patton – ‘What It’s Like To Fly Alone’

Courtney Patton is one of the best female versions of the Texas troubadour type of singer-songwriter, producing heartfelt poetic songs with gentle country backings. She produced this latest record herself as well as writing or co-writing every song bar one.

Opener ‘Shove’ is a mid-paced song about a woman at a turning point and in need of a little help regaining herself:

The stars are always shining
It’s just sometimes you can’t see em till you pull yourself away from all the lights

It is one of several she wrote solo. The introspective ‘What It’s Like To Fly Alone (The Hawk Song)’ takes its inspiration from a road encounter with a wild hawk and reflects on loneliness and depression. ‘Sometimes She Flies’, about a woman struggling with life, has a deceptively pretty melody.

The most frequent co-writer is fellow-Texan Larry Hooper, and the songs he wrote with Courtney include my favorite tracks. ‘Round Mountain’ is an engrossing confessional story song:

I was lonely when I let another’s husband share my bed
While mine was plowing fields I was breaking vows instead
And I looked down into the darkness
And I looked up and felt it burn
It was hotter than the fires of hell my crimes would surely earn

I knew what I was doing as I climbed up and jumped in
Let the murky water cool me
Let it wash away my sin

The wearied ‘Devil’s Hand’ also muses on sin and guilt. The waltztime ‘Words To My Favorite Memory’ draws on the Haggard record, using it to counterpoint the sudden death of a loved one. Lloyd Maines provides some gorgeous steel. ‘Devil’s Hand’ is an elusively poetic song about sin. The pair’s ‘Open Flame’ is about resisting the temptation to infidelity, set to a very pretty melody:

It may burn but it won’t leave a scar

‘I’ve Got One Waiting’, written by Courtney with Matt Hillyer, is a well-written pure country song about a woman drinking after her undeserving man has left her, not out of sorrow, but perhaps with a little bravado:

You used to tell me quite often
That I was uninviting and cold to the touch of your hand
So I’ve been thinking and you were right
It just hit me tonight
And I should thank you for helping me understand
I might be cold but I’m not empty
And a handle is plenty
To keep me warm when I used to have you
You chose the women
I picked the wine
One’s aged and one’s fine
But both make the bed easy to fall into
I’ll be the life of the party
So don’t even start me
To talking about how fine I am
There’s no need for debating
Gonna start celebrating
Cause I’ve got one waiting

‘This Road To You’, a wintry co-write with Micky Braun about separation on the road from Courtney’s husband Jason Eady, is another strong and thoughtful song.

There is one song which Courtney had no share in writing: ‘Gold Standard’, written by Owen Temple and Kelley Mickwee. This is a graceful waltz about enduring love.

The set concludes on valedictory note with two mournful self-penned songs about the dead. ‘Red Bandana Blue (Kent’s Song)’ is a tender waltz-time tribute to the late Texan bar owner and music promoter Kent Finlay and his influence on Courtney’s career. Even more personal is the album’s closing track. The deeply moving ‘Fourteen Years’ is a delicate reflection on Courtney’s sister who was tragically killed in an accident 14 years ago.

Grade: A

Album Review: ‘Bruce Robison & The Back Porch Band’

The tagline for Bruce Robison’s first solo in eight years reads, “recorded on analog tape with no digital shenanigans.” He goes on to say, “I will tell you one thing about this project…I wanted to leave in just enough mistakes so it sound live and, well, mission accomplished.”

Bruce Robison & The Back Porch Band came about as a result of the time he spent working on The Last Waltz, a multi-media website that acts as a “virtual social house” of music, videos, and interviews with the cream of the crop of today’s songwriters and musicians. As a result, Robison was inspired to form his own band to record a nine-track album featuring his own interpretation of originals, co-writes and covers.

Our first taste of the project, Joe Dickens’ “Rock and Roll Honky Tonk Ramblin’ Man,” about a guy refusing to cave into society’s pressures for him to suppress his rebel spirit, is an excellent infectious mid-tempo number drenched in fiddle.

Another preview track, which Robison wrote solo, is the brilliant ballad “Sweet Dreams.” The song centers around the age old tale of a small-town boy who never got out into the world, despite watching all the girls he dated take off and fly. The theme may be well worn but it never sounded sweeter than in Robison’s hands, accented with lovely heapings of mandolin and steel guitar. He also solely composed the slow-burning “Long Shore,” which rests on the nakedness of his gravely vocal.  “Long Time Comin,’” a Robison co-write with Micky Braun, is a gorgeous folk-leaning ballad with an ear-catching lyric.

Braun co-wrote “Paid My Dues,” an ironic up-tempo about the dark side of making it in the music business, with the always fantastic Jason Eady. The song, which Robison presents as a duet with Jack Ingram, has a wit and infectious melody that drew me right in. If this truly is the dark side, then they’re having way too much binging on cocaine in a cheap motel room.

My favorite track on the album is Robison’s take on Christy Hays’ “Lake of Fire,” a stunning traditionally accented ballad. “The Years,” by Damon Bramblett, is a sweet and endearing waltz concerning the trajectory of love, beautifully framed with gentle percussion mixed with fiddle and steel. Michael Heeney and John Moffat’s “Still Doing Time (In a Honky Tonk Prison)” is a classic country weeper and a brilliant one at that.

The centerpiece of the album is its most famous song, Pete Townshend’s “Squeezebox,” which Robison considers “a great country song by some English dudes.” Robison’s version is great, if cluttered, and has a nice assist from his wife Kelly Willis.

As a whole, Bruce Robison and the Back Porch Band is a welcomed surprise and a nice follow-up to the two excellent duets records he did with Willis in the past few years. I wasn’t expecting so much slower material, but there truly isn’t a sour track in the bunch. Robison’s pen is as sharp as his keen sense of song. His liner notes may begin, “You’re not going to listen to this! It’s a goddamn record!” but to heed his premonition is to miss out on one of the year’s most uniquely satisfying offerings.

Grade: A