My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Jessica Lange

Giveaway: Patsy Cline Prize Package

UPDATE:  The winner is … Lanibug.  Congratulations and we’ll be in contact with you shortly.  Everybody else, thanks for commenting and keep coming back to check out the Gary Allan giveaway we’ll be starting shortly.  Thanks again for reading My Kind of Country.

Patsy Cline has been one of the most influential female vocalists in the history of country music.  The fact that her recording career lasted less than a decade is a testament to her pure talent.  That her recordings have stood the test of time and are still beloved some 50 years later is an even greater accomplishment.  So when we began discussing legendary artists for our Spotlight Artist series, Patsy’s was one of the first names that came to mind.  We’ve been working hard this month to get you acquainted with her catalog if you weren’t already, or just reminisce with you readers who already love these songs.

Be sure to check out all the Classic Rewinds that we’ve put up of Patsy’s limited television appearances.  And to get you started with your Patsy Cline collection – or maybe just add to it – we’re giving away a Patsy Cline prize package.   One reader will win:

Patsy Cline Gold 2 CD set

Sweet Dreams movie starring Jessica Lange on DVD

Certainly Patsy’s influence on artists from Loretta Lynn to Reba McEntire to LeAnn Rimes and everywhere in between can be heard in their own recordings.  But that’s just the tip of the iceberg to Cline’s far-reaching and lasting impact on the genre of country music.

To enter, tell us who your favorite singer who’s been obviously influenced by Patsy Cline is, and why. Commenting will close January 31, 2010 at 11:59 PM.  Good luck!

Sweet Dreams – Motion Picture and Soundtrack Review

The Story of Legendary Country Singer Patsy ClineAnd I’m crazy for loving you.’ The closing line of her signature song sums up the main focus of the 1985 biopic “Sweet Dreams” based on Patsy Cline’s life from 1956 through 1963. Hollywood loves to explore the life stories behind great talents, usually offering a particular interpretation of what makes the artist tick. Screenwriter Robert Getchell, producer Bernard Schwartz and director Karel Reisz portray Patsy’s relationship with her second husband, Charlie Dick, as being a core element of what fueled her passion as an artist.

The film begins when Patsy (played by Jessica Lange who received an Oscar nomination for her performance) is married to her first husband, Gerald Cline, pictured as a guy who’s more interested in his own hobbies than in Patsy or her musical talent and career. In an early scene, the rigging on his model ship, for example, is more exciting to him than how Patsy’s performance had gone at a particular club that night.

On the other hand, a man she met at the club couldn’t take his eyes off of her. That man turns out to be Charlie Dick (Ed Harris) who gives her all the attention she’s been starved for, including attention for her music, and who has a passionate personality to match her own. It isn’t long before Patsy leaves Gerald.

As Patsy and Charlie fall head over heels, Patsy shares her dream of becoming a singer, making enough money to have the house she’d always wanted, having kids and then being able to retire to raise them. They are sweet dreams. Charlie proposes and they get married. They’re both crazy in love and off to set the world on fire.

However, where there’s fire, there’s beauty and power, and the danger of getting burned. The film depicts their marriage as both passionate and rocky, with flair ups due to their strong wills, and Charlie’s drinking, philandering and temper. In the midst of the tumultuous episodes, they share the joys of two children together and Patsy’s career successes – Charlie serving as one of her biggest fans.

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Spotlight Artist: Patsy Cline (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) – Part 3

After a successful run in Las Vegas, Patsy Cline returned to Nashville and Owen Bradley’s recording studio for what would be her last sessions. In February 1963 she recorded twelve new tracks, including a cover of Don Gibson’s “Sweet Dreams” and the Bob Wills classic “Faded Love”. She was unusually emotional and wept throughout the session; the emotion can be heard on both of these tracks. Bradley assumed that she’d had an argument with her husband, and when Charlie stopped by to see how things were going, he was quickly ushered out of the studio before Patsy saw him, so as not to break the mood.

“Leavin’ On Your Mind” had been released about a month before Patsy’s final recording sessions, in January 1963. It was the last single released during her lifetime. It reached #8 on the country chart, but unlike most of her previous hits, it was not a crossover success, stalling at #83 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Patsy Cline died on March 5, 1963 when the Piper Comanche aircraft carrying her back to Nashville from a charity concert in Kansas City, Missouri crashed amidst deteriorating weather conditions near Camden, Tennessee. Also on board were Grand Ole Opry stars Cowboy Copas and Hawkshaw Hawkins, and Patsy’s manager Randy Hughes, who had piloted the plane. There were no survivors. Patsy was interred near her home in Virginia, at the Shenandoah Memorial Park.

Decca continued to release Patsy’s singles and albums in the years following her death. “Sweet Dreams”, her first posthumous release, was a #5 country hit, and despite having been recorded previously by both Faron Young and Don Gibson, it is Patsy’s interpretation that is considered the definitive version. The follow-up single “Faded Love” reached #7 on the charts and was her last solo Top 10 hit. After that, her singles charted lower, if they charted at all. She returned to the Top 5 one final time in 1981, when RCA Records released an electronic duet of Patsy and Jim Reeves singing “Have You Ever Been Lonely (Have You Ever Been Blue)”.

In 1967, Decca released Patsy Cline’s Greatest Hits, which eventually sold more than 10 million copies. It held the record as the best-selling country album of all-time by a female artist, until the 1990s when it was overtaken by Shania Twain’s The Woman In Me. In 1973, Patsy became the first female solo artist to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Her name began to fade from the public consciousness, but was brought back to the forefront in 1980 when she was portrayed on the silver screen by actress Beverly D’Angelo in the Loretta Lynn bio-film Coal Miner’s Daughter. Five years later, Hollywood told its version of the Patsy Cline story in the film Sweet Dreams, starring Jessica Lange and Ed Harris.

Although her recording career lasted a mere eight years, Patsy Cline cast a long shadow over the country music landscape. Virtually every female country vocalist who has emerged since her death has named Patsy as an influence. Her songs have been covered by such artists as Loretta Lynn, Emmylou Harris, Reba McEntire, LeAnn Rimes and Sara Evans. Her Greatest Hits still holds the record for the longest run on the Billboard Country Albums chart for an album by a female artist, and she remains a best-selling artist for MCA, the successor company to Decca Records. We hope that you’ll enjoy our coverage as we look back at Patsy’s life and career throughout the month of January.