My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Hank Locklin

Week ending 8/7/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Why Don’t You Love Me — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Wonder Could I Live There Anymore — Charley Pride (RCA)

1980: Dancin’ Cowboys — The Bellamy Brothers (Warner Bros./Curb)

1990: Good Times — Dan Seals (Capitol)

2000: I Hope You Dance — Lee Ann Womack (MCA)

2010: Undo It — Carrie Underwood (19/Arista)

Week ending 7/31/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I — Red Foley (Decca)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Wonder Could I Live There Anymore — Charley Pride (RCA)

1980: Bar Room Buddies — Merle Haggard & Clint Eastwood (MCA)

1990: The Dance — Garth Brooks (Capitol)

2000: I Hope You Dance — Lee Ann Womack (MCA)

2010: Rain Is A Good Thing — Luke Bryan (Capitol)

Week ending 7/24/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I — Red Foley (Decca)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: He Loves Me All The Way — Tammy Wynette (Epic)

1980: True Love Ways — Mickey Gilley (Epic)

1990: The Dance — Garth Brooks (Capitol)

2000: I Hope You Dance — Lee Ann Womack (MCA)

2010: Rain Is A Good Thing — Luke Bryan (Capitol)

Week ending 7/10/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Why Don’t You Love Me — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: He Loves Me All The Way — Tammy Wynette (Epic)

1980: He Stopped Loving Her Today — George Jones (Epic)

1990: Love Without End, Amen — George Strait (MCA)

2000: I Hope You Dance — Lee Ann Womack (MCA)

2010: Water — Brad Paisley (Arista)

Week ending 7/3/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Why Don’t You Love Me — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Hello, Darlin’ — Conway Twitty (Decca)

1980: Trying To Love Two Women — The Oak Ridge Boys (MCA)

1990: Love Without End, Amen — George Strait (MCA)

2000: Yes! — Chad Brock (Warner Bros.)

2010: The House That Built Me — Miranda Lambert (Columbia)

Week ending 6/26/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Why Don’t You Love Me — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Hello, Darlin’ — Conway Twitty (Decca)

1980: One Day At A Time — Cristy Lane (Liberty)

1990: Love Without End, Amen — George Strait (MCA)

2000: Yes! — Chad Brock (Warner Bros.)

2010: The House That Built Me — Miranda Lambert (Columbia)

Week ending 6/19/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Why Don’t You Love Me — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Hello, Darlin’ — Conway Twitty (Decca)

1980: My Heart — Ronnie Milsap (RCA)

1990: Love Without End, Amen — George Strait (MCA)

2000: Yes! — Chad Brock (Warner Bros.)

2010: The House That Built Me — Miranda Lambert (Columbia)

Week ending 6/12/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Birmingham Bounce — Red Foley (Decca)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: Hello, Darlin’ — Conway Twitty (Decca)

1980: My Heart — Ronnie Milsap (RCA)

1990: Love Without End, Amen — George Strait (MCA)

2000: The Way You Love Me — Faith Hill (Warner Bros.)

2010: The House That Built Me — Miranda Lambert (Columbia)

Week ending 6/5/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Birmingham Bounce — Red Foley (Decca)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: My Love — Sonny James (Capitol)

1980: My Heart — Ronnie Milsap (RCA)

1990: I’ve Cried My Last Tear For You — Ricky Van Shelton (Columbia)

2000: The Way You Love Me — Faith Hill (Warner Bros.)

2010: The Man I Want To Be — Chris Young (RCA)

Week ending 5/29/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Birmingham Bounce — Red Foley (Decca)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: My Love — Sonny James (Capitol)

1980: Starting Over Again — Dolly Parton (RCA)

1990: Walkin’ Away — Clint Black (RCA)

2000: The Way You Love Me — Faith Hill (Warner Bros.)

2010: The Man I Want To Be — Chris Young (RCA)

Week ending 5/22/10: #1 singles this week in country music history

1950: Long Gone Lonesome Blues — Hank Williams (MGM)

1960: Please Help Me, I’m Falling — Hank Locklin (RCA)

1970: My Love — Sonny James (Capitol)

1980: Gone Too Far — Eddie Rabbitt (Elektra)

1990: Walkin’ Away — Clint Black (RCA)

2000: The Way You Love Me — Faith Hill (Warner Bros.)

2010: The Man I Want To Be — Chris Young (RCA)

Album Review: Patty Loveless – ‘Sleepless Nights’

Sleepless NightsPatty Loveless was dropped by Epic following disappointing sales and minimal airplay for her last album for the label, Dreamin’ My Dreams. She was in no hurry to make her next move, taking some time off the road to move down to Georgia, and dealing with family deaths and illness, but in 2008 she signed with the independent label Saguaro Road, and in September that year she released a new album, produced as usual by husband Emory Gordy Jr. She cast aside thoughts of regaining her chart-topping status, and instead recorded a tribute to traditional country music. It was heralded as a kind of companion piece or counterpart to 2001’s Mountain Soul, as it was billed on the cover as “the traditional country soul” of Patty Loveless. What resulted was even better than we could have expected. Sleepless Nights is a masterpiece.

Classic cover albums have a tendency to fall into one of two main categories: excessively cautious tributes where the artist sounds frankly overwhelmed by the thought of competing with a much-loved original, and ends up producing a carbon copy or high quality karaoke; and trying too hard to put their own stamp on the material in such a way that the merits of the original song are stifled. Sleepless Nights triumphantly avoids either pitfall. Patty sounds thoroughly invested in the material and style, and makes it sound alive. Her versions of each of these songs sounds as though it could have been the original classic version.

George Jones is a very challenging artist to risk comparison with, although perhaps it is less dangerous for a female vocalist where the comparisons will inevitably be less deleterious. Patty had already successfully tackled one Jones classic in the form of ‘If My Heart Had Windows’ back in the early days, and she chose to open Sleepless Nights with George’s first hit single (in 1955), the honky tonking ‘Why Baby Why’ (with a couple of minor lyric changes to fit the change in gender) which also served as the single released to promote this album. Sadly, if predictably, it was far too traditional for today’s country radio, but it is a perfect opening to the album as Patty tears into the song, the most up-tempo on the set.

Patty also picked three more Jones songs, including a truly lovely version of one of his greatest classics (written by Dickey Lee). ‘She Thinks I Still Care’ is altered here to ‘He Thinks I Still Care’. There is a fantastic take on ‘Color Of The Blues’ on which Patty actually achieves the almost impossible: improving on a song once recorded by George Jones as she infuses the lyric with pain. The most obscure Jones cover is ‘That’s All It Took’, from one of his 1960s duet albums with pop singer Gene Pitney, which is probably best known today from the 1970s cover by Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris. Patty’s version features her former guitarist, Australian Jedd Hughes, on harmonies.

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