My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Chuck Howard

Album Review: Adam Harvey – ‘Cowboy Dreams’

Released in April 2003, Cowboy Dreams was Adam’s fifth album and the second to be certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association signifying sales of 35,000 albums.

The album opens up with the “Love Bug”, the Wayne Kemp-Curtis Wayne penned hit for George Jones in 1965 and George Strait in 1993, both top ten records. It’s a silly song but Adam handles it well.

Next up is “Call It Love” a nice ballad that I could see George Strait having a hit with in his prime

Just Lookin Back On The Life We’ve Made
The Things We’ve Lost The Words To Say
A Million Words Are Not Enough
Call It Love

I Know That Sometimes I Put You Through
More Than I Should Ask Of You
There Must Be A Reason You Don’t Give Up
Call It Love

I Don’t Know What Else To Call It
When All I Wanna Do
Is Grow Old With You
What Else On Earth Can It Be When Every Time You’re With Me
A Simple Touch Tears Me Up
Call It Love

“When Lonely Met Love” is a nice up-tempo dance floor number:

He was empty as a bottle on a Saturday night
She was sweet as a rose that grows in a garden getting good sunlight
As fate would have it, the unlikely happened
In a parking lot, two worlds collide

When lonely met love, they hit it off
Dancing on the ceiling, couldn’t peel them off
Now they’re real tight, it feels real nice
Lonely ain’t looking, lonely no more
Love started popping like a bag of popcorn
When they opened up, when lonely met love

Those good old ballads of booze, women and cheating have been largely banished from modern country music so “Hush”, so this mid-tempo ballad is a refreshing change of pace

He’s looking in the mirror checking out his hair, putting on his cologne
He ain’t shaved since Tuesday but tonight every little whisker’s gone
He’s going out with the perfect wife but she ain’t his own

Chorus:
Hush…can’t talk about it
Hush…dance all around it
Everybody’s doing it old and young
Don’t breath a word cats got your tongue
Huush

She makes the kids breakfast, packs their lunch, sends them on their way
Makes all the beds and cleans up the kitchen loads the TV tray
But that ain’t coffee in the coffee cup gets her through the day

“She Don’t Know It Yet” is a wistful ballad about a man who has not been able to convey to his woman just how much he really loves her

I really love western swing and “Cowboy For A Day” is a nice example with a subject matter similar to Conway Twitty’s “Don’t Call Him A Cowboy” but with a more upbeat message and taken at a much faster tempo. This would be a great dance number

Adam’s voice is in Trace Adkins / Josh Turner territory but the structure of the album reminds me of many of George Strait’s albums, with a nice mix of slow and up-tempo songs.

My digital copy of the album did not include any information concerning songwriting credits, but it is fair to assume that where I haven’t commented, that Adam had a hand in the writing. I really liked “A Little More To It Than That” and “Little Cowboy Dreams” which I assume are Adam’s compositions. The latter is a really cute song, a father’s words to his son:

Dust off your boots, take off your star
Whistle your rocking horse in from the yard
Take off your hat you’ve tamed the wild west
But son even heroes need to get rest

Close your eyes little man it’s been a long day
And your worn out from riding it seems
Let your work in the saddle
All drift away
Into sweet little cowboy dreams

Old-timer that I am my favorite song on the album goes way back to 1965 when Lefty Frizzell recorded the Hank Cochran-Chuck Howard song “A Little Unfair”. Adam doesn’t sound like Lefty and doesn’t try to sound like Lefty but doers a very effective job with the song:

You want me to love just you while you love your share
Ain’t that being a little unfair
It’s me stay home while you stay gone till you decide to care
Ain’t that being a little unfair

I can’t see how it can be anything for me
What’s mine is yours but what’s yours is yours
That’s how you wanted to be
You want me to wait for you till you decide to care
Ain’t that being a little unfair

I can’t see how it can be anything for me
What’s mine is yours but what’s yours is yours
That’s how you wanted to be
You want me to wait for you till you decide to care
Ain’t that being a little unfair

This is a very country album – fiddle, steel guitar, thoughtful lyrics and everything else you would want in a country album.

Grade: A+

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Album Review: Highway 101 – ‘The New Frontier’

317WDCAR5NLPaulette Carlson’s departure was only the first of many changes that Highway 101 underwent in the early 90s. Guitarist Jack Daniels left in 1992 and the following year the remaining band members found themselves on a new label. They’d also parted ways with Paul Worley and Ed Seay, who had produced all of the band’s albums at to that point. Curtis Stone and Cactus Moser took over production duties along with Chuck Howard.

The changes were not for the better. While Worley and Seay had surprisingly managed to keep much of Highway 101’s signature sound intact, despite the change in lead singers, the Highway 101 heard on 1993’s The New Frontier sounds like a completely different band. The band members took over more of the songwriting responsibilities — Moser and/or Stone had a hand in writing six of the album’s ten songs. The New Frontier is less traditional than the band’s previous work; the more contemporary stylewas more beat-driven (as opposed to lyrically driven). This style was often marketed as “New Country”, “Young Country” or “Hot Country” in the early 90s. While not a terrible album, the material is noticeably weaker than their earlier efforts. Not that it mattered very much; by this time that band had slipped into commercial irrelevancy. The final nail in the coffin was the new label to which the band was signed. Liberty Records had made Garth Brooks its one and only priority — to the detriment of every artist on the label, including Paulette Carlson, whose lack of success as a solo artist was partially blamed on Capitol/Liberty’s lack of promotion.

“You Baby You” was the album’s lead single and the band’s last single to chart, landing at #67. The second single, “Who’s Gonna Love You”, a Curtis Stone song, is surprisingly unmemorable despite having been co-written by Matraca Berg. I prefer “Fastest Healin’ Broken Heart”, a Stone co-write with Pat Bunch, which comes the closest to the band’s previous musical style. It’s one of a handful of songs on the album that I truly liked, along with “Home on the Range” and “I Wonder Where The Love Goes”, a very nice ballad that closes out the album. This one must have been a particular favor, because it was later re-recorded during Chrislyn Lee’s stint as lead singer.

I intensely disliked the rock-tinged “Love Walks”, “You Are What You Do” and “No Chance To Dance”, the latter two being attempts to capitalize on the popularity of line dancing. The rest of the album’s songs are strictly forgettable.

As noted earlier, the writing was already on the wall, so it came as no surprise that The New Frontier was Highway 101’s one and only release for Liberty. It was also the band’s last recording for a major label. It is not essential listening and not particularly worth seeking out unless you are a completist music collector, in which case used copies can be obtained cheaply.

Grade: C

Album Review: Lorrie Morgan: ‘A Moment In Time’

a moment in timeHer first album in five years, and only her second in a decade, A Moment In Time was billed as Lorrie’s version of a classic country tribute. Unlike many of its type, Lorrie’s vision leaned more to the Nashville Sound and the sophisticated pop country associated with her father George Morgan, with some outright pop material from the same era. It was released on James Stroud’s Stroudavarious Records in association with Country Crossing, and produced by James Voorhis and Wally Wilson.

For something so long anticipated, A Moment In Time was a massive disappointment. Sadly Lorrie’s voice was showing marked signs of deterioration, thickened, sometimes coarse and lacking the flexibility and tone of her youth. The album was recorded in two live sessions, which may have been a mistake given the changes to Lorrie’s vocal power. This is one record when picking one of several takes might have led to a better result.

A few tracks are simply unlistenable, even with Lorrie’s voice muffled by heavy orchestration, particularly the opening number, ‘Cry’ (a pop standard which was a country hit for Lynn Anderson in 1972 and then Crystal Gayle in 1986) where she sounds like a foghorn. Sequencing the worst track at the start was a bad idea, but things (and Lorrie’s voice), do improve. She also sounds shaky vocally on an otherwise gutsy stab at ‘Wine Me Up’, but ‘Til I Get It Right’ works quite well, with Lorrie’s vocal issues suiting the song’s weary vulnerability.

Lorrie’s voice is harder to take at times on the classic country duet ‘After The Fire Is Gone’ although fellow 90s star Tracy Lawrence sounds fairly good. Raul Malo’s high tenor seems to lift Lorrie to one of her best performances on the record, as her duet partner on a passionate ‘Easy Lovin’’.

Traditional honky tonk ballad treatment of Mel Street’s hits ‘Borrowed Angel’ and ‘Loving On Back Streets’ are surprisingly successful. ‘Alright, I’ll Sign The Papers’ has a lovely retro arrangement and the vocal is pretty good. The Patsy Cline hit ‘Leavin’ On Your Mind’ is also very good, with a sweeping string arrangement and Lorrie’s best vocal on the album. This was the single selected to promote the record, although predictably it didn’t get a lot of attention as it is as far from current as one could imagine. These four are the pick of an uneven collection, together with ‘I’m Always On A Mountain When I Fall’ (a Haggard album cut written by Chuck Howard) which has quite attractive instrumentation with a Western feel and is well sung.

Falling into the mediocre category, ‘Are You Lonesome Tonight?’ is crooned and whispered without much shading in the delivery. ‘By The Time I Get To Phoenix’ is okay although it plods a bit compared to the soaring original. The AC ‘Break It To Me Gently’ is sung well enough but is rather boring, and ‘Misty Blue’ is even less interesting.

I was very disappointed by this album when it came out, mainly due to the deterioration of Lorrie’s voice. Revisiting the record for this review, I found it wasn’t as bad as I had remembered it, with a handful of decent tracks. However it remains one of her less stellar efforts, and is certainly not essential listening for any but the most ardent of fans.

Grade: C+