My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Billy Sherill

Album Review: Janie Fricke – ‘Love Notes’

Despite enjoying success singing as a featured vocalist on songs by Johnny Duncan and Charlie Rich, Janie Fricke couldn’t launch a sustainable solo career in the late 1970s. None of her albums during this period charted, including her sophomore record Love Notes, which appeared in 1978.

She wasn’t exactly hitting it out of the park with country radio, either, although she wasn’t doing horribly. Three distinctly different ballads were released as singles. The theoretical “Playing Hard To Get” hit #22 while the MOR “Let’s Try Again” rose to #28. Sandwiched between them was the steel soaked “I’ll Love Your Troubles Away for Awhile,” which peaked at #14, her first trip into the top 20 as a solo artist.

Steel is heard amongst heavy orchestration on “Somewhere To Go When It Rains,” a ballad about a woman her friend turns to when his life is in turmoil. Fricke follows with the attractive ballad “River Blue” and the lush and pleading “Let Me Love You Goodbye.”

The theatrics continue on piano ballads “Love Is Worth It All” and “You’re The One,” which aren’t particularly country. “Stirrin’ Up Feelings” is a nice change of pace, with a bit more tempo and the welcomed inclusion of drums into the mix. “Got My Mojo Working” is a slow build, where sparse production gives way to thicker sounds as the track progresses.

While there is nothing wrong with the Billy Sherill produced Love Notes, it isn’t a particularly strong album by any means. Fricke sings gorgeously throughout, but she hadn’t found her identity yet as an artist. It would be a few more years until that would happen, which makes Love Notes an important stepping stone in her career projection. Without that context, there really isn’t anything essential here to grab the listeners‘ attention.

Grade: B-

Album Review: Tammy Wynette – ‘Tammy’s Touch’

tammys-touchThe second of three albums Tammy released in 1970, Tammy’s Touch had two hit singles. The first, ‘I’ll See Him Through’, written by producer Billy Sherrill and Norro Wilson, which peaked at #2, is a beautifully understated subdued ballad about a wife wondering if her marriage which may be on the rocks, but determined to honor the past support he has given her. The arrangement has dated a bit, but Tammy’s vocal is superb.

‘He Loves Me All The Way’ (written by the same pair together with Carmol Taylor) went all the way itself to #1. It is a bouncy tune about a jealous woman doubting her man’s fidelity, apparently unfairly. On the same theme, but with a more downbeat note, ‘Cold Lonely Feeling’, written by Jerry Chesnut, is a very good song about a married woman plagued by doubt.

Also excellent is Curly Putnam’s ‘The Divorce Sale’, using a separating couple’s selloff of unwanted joint possessions to highlight the sadness of the split. It could have been a big hit if released as a single for Tammy. The subdued ‘Our Last Night Together’ is from the point of view of the ‘other woman’ as her affair with a married man comes to an end.

Sherrill’s ‘Too Far Gone’ (best known from Emmylou Harris’s version a few years later) is a beautiful song, and Tammy’s version is lovely. Sherrill wrote ‘A Lighter Shade Of Blue’ (another good song) with Glenn Sutton. A troubled wife-cum-doormat in an on-off relationship is beginning to feel the pain less by repetition, and to love him a little less each time. Sutton and Tammy’s future husband George Richey wrote ‘Love Me, Love Me’, quite a nice romantic ballad. Jerry Crutchfield’s ‘You Make My Skies Turn Blue’ is another pretty love song.

The sultry ‘He Thinks I Love Him’, written by Carmol Taylor, has a potentially intriguing lyric about a controlling husband which is defused by revealing that she does indeed love the man. ‘Run, Woman, Run’ offers advice to a flighty young newlywed thinking of leaving. The heavily orchestrated ‘Daddy Doll’ will be far too saccharine for most modern listeners, but in its own way points out the sadness of divorce for the children involved.

‘It’s Just A Matter Of Time’ is a cover of a 1959 R&B hit for Brook Benton, but Tammy probably recorded it as it was a contemporary country hit for Sonny James; it may be most familiar to country fans from Randy Travis’s 1989 version. Tammy’s take is not particularly distinctive. Finally, ‘Lonely Days (And Nights More Lonely)’ is a pretty good song about separation from a loved one.

This is a very strong album, albeit firmly one of its time. It should appeal to all Tammy Wynette fans.

Grade: A-