My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Bill Haley and His Comets

Album Review: Hank Williams Jr. – ‘Your Cheatin’ Heart: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack’

51rF-K-UoXL1985’s Sweet Dreams is somewhat of an anomaly when it comes to biographical films about musicians, in that the real Patsy Cline’s vocals are used for the soundtrack. Usually the actor attempts to do a reasonable impersonation of the subject: Sissy Spacek did it in Coal Miner’s Daughter and and Joaquin Phoenix did it in Walk the Line. 1964’s Hank Williams biopic Your Cheatin’ Heart starring George Hamilton, took a third approach by hiring a third party to do the singing. The producers went with the logical choice, Hank Williams Jr., who does a reasonable impression of his late father. It’s an impressive effort, considering that Hank Jr. was only 15 years old at the time.

I generally dislike musical impersonations, but soundtrack albums do need to be considered in their context and in a more forgiving manner. Your Cheatin’ Heart was Hank Jr.’s second album for MGM; the first had been released earlier the same year and also consisted of his father’s material. At that point in time, MGM was mainly interested in making him into a clone of his father.

There is no questioning that the material itself is top-notch. It’s also apparent, even at this early stage in his career, that the son had a stronger voice than the father. While I’d rather listen to Hank Jr. singing these songs as Hank Jr and not pretending to be his father, it’s impossible not to enjoy this album. The arrangements were all updated make them more contemporary — and in 1964 that meant Nashville Sound choruses and string sections, which certainly were not true to Hank Sr.’s era, but thankfully the producers were admirably restrained in using them. The only thing I really found objectionable was the saxophone on “Jambalaya (on the Bayou)” and “Hey Good Lookin'”, which would be more appropriate on a Bill Haley and the Comets recording. Fortunately, there are alternate versions of both songs without the saxophone.

Rhino Records reissued the album on CD in 1997 and included previously unreleased acoustic versions of most of the album’s songs. I have a soft spot for stripped-down versions of pretty much any song, so I particularly enjoyed listening to these, even though it makes the listening experience a bit repetitious. “There’ll Be No Teardrops Tonight” does not appear on the original soundtrack album so its inclusion on the CD is a bonafide bonus.

As well done as these songs are, they are mainly interesting because they show the origins of an artist who would entirely reinvent himself over the course of his career. In 1964 Hank Jr. had not yet found his own voice, but I still prefer these early efforts to his 80s Southern rock party anthems.

Grade: A-

Album Review: Patsy Cline – ‘The Rockin’ Side: Her First Recordings, Volume 3′

Commercial success eluded Patsy Cline throughout the 1950s in no small part due to Owen Bradley’s sometimes radical (for the day) experimentation with a wide variety of musical styles, as they searched to find her niche. In an era in which Kitty Wells was the primary example of what a girl singer, as they were known at the time, should sound like, Patsy’s more polished vocal style was a hard sell to country audiences, despite her obvious talent. Patsy resisted Bradley’s efforts to push her in a more pop direction, for which he felt her voice was better suited. The emergence of rock and roll and the tremendous success of Elvis Presley perhaps made it inevitable that Patsy and Bradley would experiment with rockabilly. The final volume of Rhino Records’ trilogy of Patsy’s early recordings for Four Star, titled The Rockin’ Side, focuses on those rockabilly efforts.

The thirteen tracks were recorded between 1955 and 1959, spanning the duration of Patsy’s Four Star contract. W.S. Stevenson, which was the pseudonym for Four Star Music’s owner Bill McCall, shares songwriting credits on eight of the tracks. Despite her expressed preference for singing honky-tonk, Patsy sounds perfectly at ease with the rockabilly material, and one suspects that had any of these recordings caught on commercially, her career might well have taken a very different direction. She could easily have been a rival for Wanda Jackson and Rose Maddox for the title Queen of Rockabilly.
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