My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Barry Gibb

Album Review: Kenny Rogers – ‘Eyes That See In The Dark’

In 1983 Kenny jumped ship from Liberty and headed to a lucrative new deal with RCA. His first album for the new label headed even further down the pop road, including recruiting British disco star Barry Gibb (of the Bee Gees) as his producer and songwriter.

There was one monster hit from the album which is still familiar today. ‘Islands In The Stream’, one of the Gibb songs, was originally recorded solo, but Kenny was not initially happy with the results. Then someone had the brilliant idea to turn it into a duet with Dolly Parton, who was also trying to marry pop and country stardom at the time. It stormed country, pop and AC charts, and was a hit internationally as well – understandably so, as it is a great pop song with a catchy melody, which has nothing to do with country music but has achieved classic status. The duet pairing would go on to tour together, record several albums together including a Christmas effort, and is more familiar to the general public than Dolly’s early partnership with Porter Wagoner.

But if this song could not be ignored, country radio was more circumspect with the following singles. The title track, a boring pop ballad with strangely echoey vocals apparently copied from Gibb’s demo, peaked at #30 on the Billboard country chart. ‘This Woman’ was a #2 AC and top 30 pop hit, but was too disco for country radio, which instead played the more country sounding B Side, ‘Buried Treasure’. This is a pleasant mid-paced love song with banked harmonies from the Gatlin Brothers saving it from being completely forgettable. The Gatlins also back up Kenny on the final single, ‘Evening Star’. This is actually quite a nice song with an inspirational Western theme, and the single peaked just outside the top 10.

AC leaning ballad ‘You And I’ (featuring Barry Gibb’s harmonies) was not a single, but it became a staple of Kenny’s live shows; I find it rather dull and find Kenny’s vocals a bit whispery. ‘Hold Me’ and ‘I Will Always Love You’ (not the Dolly Parton classic but another Gibb brothers’ pop song) are in a similar vein.

The Bee Gees (Barry Gibb and his brothers) provide the backing vocals on ‘Living With You’, a generic disco track with nothing to interest the country fan. ‘Midsummer Nights’ is a mid paced sexy love song.

‘Islands In The Stream’ is really the only good song on this album.

Grade: D-

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Spotlight Artist: Kenny Rogers

Our October spotlight artist has had a career spanning more than fifty years and has enjoyed tremendous success in a variety of musical genres. Kenneth Ray Rogers was born on August 21, 1938 in Houston, Texas. His recording career dates back to the 1950s. After enjoying a minor hit in 1957 with “That Crazy Feeling” he joined a jazz group called The Bobby Doyle Three. After the group disbanded in 1965 he had a brief stint with the New Christy Minstrels. A year later, he and some of his bandmates formed a new group, Kenny Rogers and The First Edition. Marketed primarily as a rock group, The First Edition dabbled in a variety of styles, including psychedelic pop, folk, and R&B. In 1969 the group enjoyed a Top 40 country hit with the Mel Tillis-penned “Ruby Don’t Take Your Love to Town”. Although it was only a modest success on the country charts, it reached the Top 10 on both the pop and adult contemporary charts.

After The First Edition disbanded, Rogers reinvented himself as a country artist, signing a solo deal with United Artists Records 1n 1975. His first single for the label, “Love Lifted Me” reached the Top 20 on the country charts. Two more minor hits followed, and in 1977 he enjoyed his breakthrough hit “Lucille”, a story song about an aborted one-night stand that occurs shortly after the narrator witnesses the breakup of his partner’s marriage in a bar. It reached #1 on the country charts and #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and enjoyed international success as well. For the rest of the 1970s and well into the 1980s, Kenny Rogers was country music’s best selling artist. Most of his records enjoyed success on both the pop and country charts.

He recorded a number of hit duets with United Artists labelmate Dottie West in the late 1970s, beginning with 1978’s “Every Time Two Fools Collide”. The exposure not only revived West’s solo career; it took it to new heights. In 1980 she enjoyed her first solo #1 hit, twenty years into her recording career.

Also in 1978, Rogers released the song with which he is most closely identified today: “The Gambler”, which led to a number of made-for-TV movies with Rogers in the starring role. In 1980 he teamed up with Lionel Richie, who wrote and produced “Lady”, Rogers’ only solo record to top the Billboard Hot 100.

United Artists was sold to EMI in 1978 and was renamed Liberty Records in 1980. Rogers remained with the label until 1983, when he signed a $20 million deal with RCA (a huge sum in those days). His last #1 hit for Liberty was a remake of Bob Seger’s “We’ve Got Tonight” performed as a duet with Scottish singer Sheena Easton. After signing with RCA, Rogers teamed up with Barry Gibb, who produced and wrote most of the material for Eyes That See In The Dark,
the debut album for his new label. The first single from that project was “Islands in the Stream”, which found Kenny collaborating for the first time with Dolly Parton. Although country in name and marketing only, the tune quickly topped the country charts and reached the top of the Hot 100 as well, marking the second and last time that either artist would top that chart. It went on to become a global hit.

At the same time, Liberty Records was still releasing Kenny Rogers singles, and “Scarlet Fever”, his final release for his former label, became a #5 country hit at the same time “Islands in the Stream” was climbing the charts. Rogers remained with RCA through the end of the decade. During his tenure with the label, his music became more adult-contemporary oriented while the rest of country music went in the opposite direction when the New Traditionalist movement got underway. In 1989, Kenny moved to Reprise Records (his label during his First Edition days), and his chart success began to become less consistent.

The 1990s marked the beginning of a long dry spell. He left Warner/Reprise and eventually started his own label Dreamcatcher. In 1999 he enjoyed a surprise late-career hit when “The Greatest”, a tune about a young boy dreaming of becoming a professional baseball player, reached #26 on the country charts. Many regarded the surprise hit as an outlier, but country music had not yet heard the last of Kenny Rogers. He enjoyed another unexpected hit in 1999 when “Buy Me a Rose” went to #1, making the 61-year-old Kenny Rogers the oldest artist to ever top the Billboard country chart. The record was broken a few years later when 69-year-old Willie Nelson topped the chart with his Toby Keith duet “Beer For My Horses”.

The success of “Buy Me a Rose” was enough to make the major labels take another look at Kenny Rogers. He released “Water & Bridges” for Capitol in 2006 and You Can’t Make Old Friends for Warner Bros in 2013. The title track of the latter paired him up once again with Dolly Parton. That same year he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Two years later he announced his retirement and embarked on a farewell tour that is scheduled to conclude in Nashville at the end of this month.

Critics have often derided Kenny Rogers as not authentically country, and there is no doubt that because he tried to maintain a presence on both the pop and country charts, not all of his music will appeal to everyone. That being said, there is no denying his contributions to and impact on the country genre. We can’t possibly do justice to a 50-year career in just one month, so we’ll be focusing mainly on his country successes of the 1970s and 1980s.

Album Review: Ricky Skaggs – ‘Music To My Ears’

Most country music stars record less frequently once the major label phase of their careers end, but Ricky Skaggs is a notable exception to the rule: his independent albums far outnumber his major label efforts. From a fan’s standpoint, this is a good thing, though he has become so prolific it is sometimes difficult to keep up with his output. Music To My Ears, which was released last week, dropped just a little over a year after 2011’s Country Hits Bluegrass Style and a second volume of Skaggs family Christmas songs.

Like most of Skaggs’ post-1997 output, Music To My Ears leans heavily toward bluegrass; however, this is not strictly a collection of bluegrass tunes. He pushes the envelope just a bit by incorporating some Celtic instruments such as the bagpipes and tin whistle, along with the occasional electric guitar and keyboard. Some bluegrass purists may cry foul, but the vast majority of time the blending of styles works well. A prime example is “What You Are Waiting For”, an inspirational but not overtly religious number, which effectively combines some traditional bluegrass instruments — banjo and mandolin — with a piano intro, and some electric guitar tracks and background vocals that would not sound out of place on today’s country radio.

Overall, however, the album’s more traditional numbers are its best — from the high lonesome sound of the opening track “Blue Night” and Carter Stanley’s “Loving You Too Well”, to the wonderful picking on the instrumental “New Jerusalem”, which Ricky wrote. And then there’s the unusual “You Can’t Hurt Ham”, a Skaggs co-write with Gordon Kennedy, who co-produced the album with Ricky. It is, essentially, a tongue-in-cheek tune about spoiled food and the supposed long shelf life of ham. While I don’t agree with his claim of “no refrigerate, no expire date”, the song is a very entertaining number.

Like most of Ricky’s albums, Music To My Ears contains a handful of religious and inspirational numbers. There’s the aformentioned “New Jerusalem” and “What You Are Waiting For”, as well as the more openly religious title track, and the family-values themed “Nothing Beats A Family”. Interestingly, none of the members of the Skaggs-White clan makes any appearances on this album.

The one track that doesn’t quite work is the apparent centerpiece of the album, “Soldier’s Son”, a duet with Barry Gibb. The song itself, which Gibb wrote with his children Ashley and Stephen, is not bad but its attempt to alternate between bluegrass and mainstream pop elements seems a bit forced. Aside from that,I’ve never been able to tolerate Gibb’s singing and that alone is enough to spoil the song for me. It is however, the album’s sole misstep, with the possible exception of the background vocals at the end of “Nothing Beats A Family.” All in all, however, there is far more here to like than dislike, unless one is just not a bluegrass fan. Those who are will find this collection most enjoyable.

Grade: A-