My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Ashley Brown

Album Review: Jim Lauderdale – The Bluegrass Diaries

Jim Lauderdale may be one of the most eclectic artists we have ever covered here at MKOC, but he has an enduring love for bluegrass and has recorded several records in that style. In 2006 he had released two albums simultaneously, Country Super Hits Vol 11, which Jonathan reviewed the other day, and Bluegrass, another excellent effort. The following year he doubled up on his traditonal bluegrass stylings for The Bluegrass Diaries on Yep Roc Records. Produced by the multi-talented Randy Kohrs and featuring all self-penned originals, it won a Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album.

The record opens with ‘This Is The Last Time (I’m Ever Gonna Hurt)’, written with Odie Blackmon, which features an archetypal high mountain wailing vocal and an optimistic lyric about moving on from heartbreak. Blackmon also co-wrote ‘Chances’, a ballad with some very pretty fiddle about struggling with sin.

The intensely yearning ‘Can We Find Forgiveness’ is another strong track about sin and redemption. Bluegrass star Dave Evans adds harmony vocals on this track and on ‘It’s Such A Long Journey Home’. This is a beautiful ballad which Jim wrote with Candace Rudolph in the Appalachian old-time tradition about the longing for home and a loved one.

‘I Wanted To Believe’ is a regretful song about a failed relationship; Cia Cherryholmes provides a harmony vocal. ‘Looking For A Good Place To Land’, written with Shawn Camp (who plays acoustic guitar throughout), is very pleasant. Paul Craft co-wrote ‘Are You Having Second Thoughts?’, a pretty, tender ballad with tight harmonies from Ashley Brown. ‘One Blue Mule’, in contrast, is a fast paced semi-humorous number set in the Gold Rush, with some super picking.

Melba Montgomery co-wrote the gentle ‘All Roads Lead Back To You’, while J D Souther contributed to ‘My Somewhere Just Got Here’, a solemn love song. Both songwriters joined Jim for the entertaining up-tempo closing track, ‘Ain’t No Way To Run’, in which he calls the bluff of a partner who keeps on threatening to leave. The musicians really get the chance to stretch out here.

This is an excellent bluegrass album, well worth catching up with.

Grade: A

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Album Review: Randy Kohrs – ‘Quicksand’

Talented musician Randy Kohrs is best known for his dobro (resonator guitar) playing on other artists’ records, but he also has a fine voice and has released a number of his own albums. His latest, on Rural Rhythm Records, was originally due to be released last year, but was delayed until this month. He produced it himself in his own studio (as he has done before). There is a mixture of blues, country, and bluegrass, all acoustic. The backings, from a variety of mainly bluegrass musicians, are fabulous throughout, and always appropriate for the song. The whole album is a pleasure to listen to.

Randy wrote or co-wrote five of the 13 tracks, including the outstanding song on the album, ‘Die On The Vine’, written with Dennis Goodwin and set to a very pretty tune. This opens with the auction of a farm’s contents, and builds with the farmer’s being saved from relapsing into alcoholic despair, by remembering his father’s advice 20 years earlier:

“Son don’t let your life die on the vine
Don’t plant your roots in whiskey and red wine
Grow up straight and tall like an old Georgia pine
Son don’t let your life die on the vine”

Then I pushed away my glass
And pulled myself up straight
I knew that I could stand up
To the bitter winds of fate
Cause suddenly I’d realized
That one thing hadn’t sold
The best thing daddy ever planted
Was his strength in my soul

Harmony vocals on this track (and several others) come from Garnet and Ronnie Bowman.

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