My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Classic Rewind: Janie Fricke – ‘Down To My Last Broken Heart’

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Album Review: Ashley McBryde – ‘Girl Goin’ Nowhere’

Arkansas-born singer-songwriter Ashley McBryde emerged last year with her impressive Warner Brothers single ‘Little Dive Bar In Dahlonega’. This well written song about finding relief from a hard life was inspired by the co-writer’s real life story of meeting his future spouse. There is an optimistic mood which is counterpointed by a detailed and realistic picture of small town America. It is a really good song, well suing by Ashley. The only complaint I have is with slightly intrusive production. Jay Joyce, best known for his work with Eric Church (who helped to bring Ashley to the fore, and to whom she is being compared), is the guilty party here, and his rock background dominates on Ashley’s new album.

The most effective tracks are the quitter, more reflective ones (like ‘Dahlonega’). The title track is a delicate acoustic song about the struggles of making it as a musician and defying those who tried to discourage her early on and now pretend they always supported her:

“Don’t waste your life behind that guitar
You may get gone, but you won’t get far
You’re not the first
You won’t be the last
And you can tell us all about it
When you come crawling back”

Then the lights come up
And I hear the band
And where they said I’d never be
Is exactly where I am
I hear the crowd
I look around
And I can’t find one empty chair
Not bad for a girl goin’ nowhere

I need to thank my daddy
For that first set of strings
And all those folks who swore I’d never be anything

To the end, this remains understated and thoughtful, as does ‘Andy (I Can’t Live Without You)’. This is a realistic love song about a man who has his fair share of imperfections and irritating behaviour, but is still the love of her life. Apparently it is actually about Ashley’s male best friend and room mate rather than a romantic interest as such, but it feels more like a marriage.

You drink my whiskey without askin’
You put your boots up on my couch
It drives me crazy to remind you
More than once to take the garbage out
You used my good towels on the dog
That’s the only thing I’ve asked you not to do
Most days I’d love to lock you out
I can’t live without you

The kitchen table ain’t for business
I wish you’d put the bills where they go
I guess you’d need an invitation to the backyard
To see that it needs mowin’
You leave your whiskers in the sink
And I’ve told you ’til I’m black and blue
You never worry what our neighbors think
I can’t live without you

‘Cause you’ve got my back
Even when I’m wrong
You’re the only one who knows me and my heart can’t get along
I got reasons to cry and can’t tell you which one
But you don’t ask no questions
You just hold me ’til I’m done
And when I’m lookin’ to fight
You flat refuse
I can’t live without you

You’re always voicin’ your opinion
You play your guitar way too loud
And God, I reckon it would kill you
To lift a finger and help me clean this house
You know your jokes ain’t all that funny
But I’ll keep on laughin’ if you want me to
Nobody understands why I love you
I can’t live without you

A very stripped down arrangement allows the song to shine.

These three tracks are all fantastic and strongly recommended by me.

Elsewhere the sound is more rock-influenced. ‘Radioland’ is a catchy country rock ode to the joys of music encountered as a child. ‘The Jacket’ is a very nice mid-paced tribute to a beloved old article of clothing symbolic of Ashley’s father’s life.

‘American Scandal’ is a sultry rock ballad comparing a relationship to an illicit one (specifically President Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe); I didn’t particularly like this lyrically, although it was well sung; and the production was heavy handed. It leads into the bluesy soulful ‘Southern Babylon’, again a good song but not to my taste, with hushed vocals and supernatural-inspired lyrics.

‘Living Next To Leroy’ is an excellent song about high school friends whose lives are destroyed by crystal meth “on the dark side of the country” – very powerful lyrics but spoiled by the heavy electric guitar – although perhaps its very dissonance is making a point.

‘El Dorado’ on the other hand is too loud and busy from the start, although there is an engaging lyric about life on the road. ‘Home Sweet Highway’, abut being on the way home is a bit more restrained and all the better for it. ‘Tired Of Being Happy’ is a pretty good song about an encounter with a recently married ex, and offering him a way out, once more rather smothered by the backings.

Ashley McBryde is an extremely talented artist with very strong songwriting skills. However some of the arrangements on this record don’t work for me. Those who do like more rock influences in the country should find much to love in this album, and I think it’s worth checking out even if that doesn’t apply.

Grade: B+

Album Review: Dawn Sears – ‘What A Woman Wants To Hear’

Dawn Sears’ debut album on Warner Brothers Records was released in 1991. Barry Beckett acted as producer. ‘San Antone’, her very first single for Warner Brothers, having failed to chart the previous year, it was removed from consideration for the album, but if you want to hear this very retro Patsy Cline style ballad, you can check it out on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIAyvGo_-DQ

However, the label retained the second single, although it too had made no chart impact. ‘Till You Come Back To Me’ was another beautifully sung slow ballad, but slightly more contemporary in style, and was written by Mike Reid and Troy Seals. Dawn’s vocals soar on this big ballad.

Dawn showed she was as good with up-tempo material with a committed cover of Highway 101’s ‘Good Goodbye’ (a track on that band’s debut album a few years earlier and co-written by Paulette Carlson). Dawn’s version uses the same arrangement as the original, but she delivers the attitude believably. Warner Brothers’ last unsuccessful attempt at getting Dawn on the radio came with ‘Tell Me I’m Crazy’, another Mike Reid tune (co-written this time with Rory Michael Bourke). This sophisticated loungy ballad is exquisitely performed, and was later covered in very similar style by Shelby Lynne.

‘Odds And Ends (Bits And Pieces)’ had most recently been recorded by Lynne on her own 1989 debut album, but was an older classic, written by Harlan Howard. It is another slow paced ballad which was ideally suited to both artists’ vocal ability.

A number of the other tracks were either covers or were later picked up by other artists. The classic Hank Williams hit is treated very authentically and highly enjoyable. ‘He’s In Dallas’ was recorded by Reba McEntire on her 1991 album For My Broken Heart, and was later covered by fellow Spotlight Artist Linda Davis. A mournful ballad about the failure of a relationship and the collapse off all the protagonist’s dreams for her future, as she returns home to her mother in Minnesota, disconsolate. Dawn’s vocal is exceptional.

The title track (coincidentally a song co-written by Davis) is another excellent ballad yearning to be treated well, which should have been a big hit for someone. This is another of the highlights on this album. ‘Old Fashioned Broken Heart’ is a great traditional country heartbreak ballad written by Donny Kees and Terri Sharp, is superb, and one of my favorite tracks here, assisted by some nice fiddle.

She delivers up some western swing on the assertive ‘No More Tears’, and sultry blues on ‘Could Be The Mississippi’, showing her range.

This was a very good album which slipped beneath the radar.

Grade: A-

Classic Rewind: Ronna Reeves – ‘Brand New Tennessee Waltz’

Album Review: Linda Davis – ‘Some Things Are Meant To Be’

Sometimes life just isn’t fair. Linda Davis was beautiful, a talented and versatile vocalist and had two stints on major labels but basically nothing ever really worked out for her. Ironically, her daughter Hillary Scott, a far less talented vocalist, would have a big career as part of the band Lady Antebellum.

This album, her second for Arista Records would prove to be her highest charting album reaching #26 on Billboard’s county albums chart. Released in January 1996, three singles were released from the album, including the title track, her most successful solo single reaching #13.

“Some Things Are Meant to Be” is a nice contemporary ballad from the pens of Michael Garvin & Gordon Payne. It strikes me as more adult contemporary than country but it is a great performance. Since this song couldn’t get Linda into the top ten, it figures that nothing else could either.

 I know that you’ve got feelings

For me like I got feelings for you

So shouldn’t you be reaching

For me like I keep reaching for you

Save yourself a lot of trouble

Trying to fight it

There’s just no way you can

 

No, you can’t stop the river from rollin’ to the ocean

It’s a destiny that the good Lord put into motion

Like a baby’s tears and a mother’s devotion

Some things are meant to be

And one of them is you and me

“A Love Story in the Making” by Al Anderson & Craig Wiseman is a decent ballad that Linda sings well. The song was the second single from the album reaching #33 (our Canadian country neighbors liked it more, sending it to #22). The song sounds much more country than the title track and should have been a much bigger hit.Jenny’s got a trailer on the county line

Jenny’s got a trailer on the county line

Satellite dish working overtime Watchin’ those movies on a

Watchin’ those movies on a 30 inch screenDreamin’ about places she’s never seen

Dreamin’ about places she’s never see

 

She’s in the diner by five o’clock

Playin’ Elvis on the old juke box

Staring out the window at nothing in sight

As she sings ‘Are you lonesome tonight’

 

Every time some stranger walks in through that door She can’t help but wonder if he’s the one she’s been waiting for

She can’t help but wonder if he’s the one she’s been waiting for

It’s a love story in the making

It’s a love story in the making
Something that was meant to be
A heart patiently waiting for a little bit of destiny
A sweet love story is all she needs

“Walk Away” by Marc Beeson& Robert Byrne was the third single from the album and it stiffed completely, not even charting (the Canadians had it reach #80). The song is a bland ballad that wasn’t really single-worthy although Linda sings it well

What do I do now that our love’s come to such a bitter end
We’ve been through too much together for me to be your friend
And I can’t pretend
I’m sure I’ll see you, but when I do I will

Walk away
And hope my feet don’t fail me
Walk away
As far as they will take me
Long before you have a chance
To look into these eyes
I’ll be gone and you won’t see me cry
If I walk away

Harry Stinson is a very talented fellow, singer, songwriter, drummer, who I think could have been a big star if only he had wanted to be,   “Always Will” is a terrific song that I would have released as a single:

If time is a train rollin down the tracks
Every minute is a box car that don’t come back
Take a look around you it’s all gonna change
Whatever you see ain’t neve gonna stay the same
Except for the rain and the wind in the trees
And the way I feel about you and me

And the way I feel when I’m with you
It’s like the roll of the ocean
And the calm quiet of the moon
And when you hold me time stands still
It always has and it always will

“Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye)”by Jim Weatherly was a big po[p hit for Gladys Knight & The Pips back in the early 1970s. It was covered as a county hit by Bob Luman, reaching #7 while the Knight version was on the pop charts. Linda sings the song well, but it is strictly an album track

Nancy Lee Baxter ‘s “She Doesn’t Ask” is a typical ‘wronged woman waiting for her man to show up’ song – in other words, nothing special

“Cast Iron Heart”, written by Dennis Linde had been a single twice – for Pearl River in 1992 and for Blackhawk in 1995. Since neither of the above two bands released this song as a single, it might have been a decent single for Linda. it would have been grittier than anything else she had released as a single

 Go on and cry, but you won’t change my mind

Your pain and troubles don’t concern me

I gave you my love, but it was not enough

I was just your bridge and girl you burned me

 

So don’t hand me no hard luck story

Hopin’ I’ll just fall apart

Remember you’re the one who left me

With nothin’ but this cast iron heart

The album closes with “There Isn’t One” (writers Cathy Majeski, Sunny Russ, Stephony Smith), “What Do I Know” (another Majeski, Russ, Smith collaboration) and “If I Could Live Your Life”(writers Tim Nichols, Mark D. Sanders), all competently performed (the latter song with Reba McEntire) but none of them especially singles worthy .

“If I Could Live Your Life” is a melodramatic pop ballad, without much of anything to make it a standout track

 You jet from coast to coast

Dressed in designer clothes

When you appear somewhere

Your chauffeur drives you there

I would think twice

If I could live your life

 

You see your friends at the store

Your sister lives next door

You kiss your babies goodnight

Your husband’s there at your side

I’d love to give it a try

If I could live your life

Linda would issue an album on Dream Works about three years later, and then a few albums on independent label Center Hill from 2003-2007, before disappearing from recording for a decade. She can sing anything and perhaps she could have become a major adult contemporary star if promotional efforts (and record production) had been pointed in that direction. As it was she was caught somewhere in-between without being given her best chance at stardom.

On the whole, I like this album. While it teeters between adult contemporary and country, it is a pleasant album to listen to (it could use more fiddle and steel and a few more up-tempo tracks) and I have listened to this album a few times over the last few years and would give it a B.

Classic Rewind: Gretchen Wilson – ‘I Don’t Feel Like Loving You Today’

Classic Rewind: Johnny Paycheck – ‘Me And The IRS’

Album Review: Don Gibson – ‘The Best Of The Hickory Records Years (1970–1978)’

If he had written only “I Can’t Stop Loving You”, “Oh Lonesome Me” and “Sweet Dreams”, Don Gibson would be worth remembering. As it was Don had a successful career with RCA during the 1950s and 1960 that saw him run off a long string of successful singles (17 top ten singles) and albums. After 1966, however, the hits began to taper off, for various reasons that I won’t discuss here. A long-time writer for Acuff-Rose, Gibson signed with the Acuff-Rose subsidiary Hickory Records in 1970, and that’s where this story begins:

Up until now, Don Gibson had been very poorly served during the digital era. There have been various CD releases but most of them have featured a few of Don’s Hickory singles plus remakes of Don’s RCA hits. While this isn’t exactly surprising, since Don’s RCA hits are a Hall of Fame catalog in themselves, the fact remains that the RCA originals have been widely available whereas the Hickory hits have been quite scarce.

Don had twenty-nine solo country chart hits on Hickory, many of them unavailable until now. This new collection contains the biggest twenty of Don’s charting Hickory singles, plus five key album tracks.

Is this an adequate collection?

Well, not really since many, including myself, like some of the Hickory remakes better than the RCA originals. The original RCA recordings were sometimes saddled with dense “Nashville Sound” production; whereas the production on these recordings is more mainstream country, with fiddle and steel guitar being much more prominent than in the later RCA recordings.

During Don’s later years, as the genre shifted toward outlaw and urban cowboy, Don released some very good singles that did not chart as highly as earlier endeavors, and remain unavailable to this day. I would have preferred a two-disc collection capturing all charted singles, the RCA remakes, at least a few of the Don Gibson-Sue Thompson duets (none of them huge hits although nine of them charted) and maybe a dozen key album cuts. For maximum bang for the buck, I would suggest buying this album first and then getting the Varese collection 20 Greatest Songs, or perhaps the Curb 18 Greatest Hits.

Still, what is here is excellent in every sense of the word, excellent production, excellent songs and a very idiosyncratic song stylist still at the peak of his powers. During the Hickory years, Don wrote less of his own material but proved to have a good ear for picking songs. What follows is the track list for this album. You might note that “Far Far Away” charted for Don on RCA and on Hickory, and that several of the songs (“Snap Your Fingers”, “The Fool”, “Starting All Over Again” and “Any Day Now”) were remakes of old pop or R&B hits; given a very distinctive Don Gibson spin.

Track Listing (BB = Billboard / RW = Record World):

  1. Games People Play (album track) – written by Joe South
  2. Don’t Take All Your Loving (#17 BB / #10 RW)
  3. Pretending Everyday (album track)
  4. A Perfect Mountain (#16 BB / #10 RW)
  5. Guess Away The Blues (#19 BB / #15 RW)
  6. Having Second Thoughts (album track)
  7. (I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle (#29 BB / #25 RW)
  8. Country Green (#5 BB & RW) – written by Eddy Raven
  9. Far Far Away (#12 BB & RW)
  10. Woman [Sensuous Woman] (#1 BB & RW)
  11. Is This The Best I’m Gonna Feel (#11 BB & RW)
  12. If You’re Goin’ Girl (#26 BB / #22 RW)
  13. Touch The Morning (#6 BB / #5 RW)
  14. Snap Your Fingers (#12 BB / #13 RW)
  15. One Day At A Time (#8 BB / #5 RW)
  16. Bring Back Your Love To Me (#9 / #10 RW)
  17. I’ll Sing For You (#27 BB / #22 RW)
  18. [There She Goes] I Wish Her Well (#24 BB & RW)
  19. What’s Happened To Me (album track)
  20. Praying Hands (album track)
  21. I’m All Wrapped Up In You (#23 BB / #27 RW)
  22. If You Ever Get To Houston [Look Me Down] (#16 BB / #18 RW)
  23. Starting All Over Again (#16 BB / #14 RW)
  24. The Fool (#22 BB / #24 RW)
  25. Any Day Now (#26 BB & RW)

I would give this collection an A+ with the caveat that you really need to pick up one of the earlier collections of Hickory recordings to get the full impact of Don’s tenure with the Hickory label. Noted music journalist Craig Shelburne penned the very informative liners.

Classic Rewind: Ronna Reeves – ‘Heartbreak Shoes’

Album Review: Linda Davis – ‘Shoot For The Moon’

Linda Davis released her third album Shoot To The Moon in the wake of the massive success of “Does He Love You.” It was her first of two releases for Arista Nashville.

The album employed the technique of maximizing exposure from a superstar collaboration, a ploy that honestly never works (just ask Ashley Monroe and Cassidee Pope). The album was a modest hit for Davis, though, peaking at #28.

I’ll be honest and say I only had access to have the album’s tracks courtesy of YouTube, which I’ll be using to assess the project. I dislike making that admission, but the record has yet to be made available digitally.

Lead single “Company Time” is an enjoyable uptempo number written and previously recorded by Mac McAnally. The song tells the story of an employee facing a reprimand by her boss. It’s good, but lacks punch and feels weak for a track so upbeat. t unsurprisingly stalled at #46.

The second and final single “Love Didn’t Do It” is a much stronger song and far more inviting than its predecessor. Going back and watching the video, it’s hilarious how much Arista was attempting to morph Davis into Reba McEntire, with the hair ‘jacked to Jesus’ performing to an arena crowd with one of those microphones on her head. The “live” video is entertaining but a bit presumptuous. The track stalled at #48.

Speaking of McEntire, Shoot for the Moon includes a cover of “He’s In Dallas,” which comes from For My Broken Heart. I’ve always loved Davis’ natural twang and she shines here perfectly.

“When You Took Your Love Away” is a nice rootsy surprise that breaks up the somewhat AC-leaning aspects of the album. I love the heavy dose of mandolin and dobro.

The final of the five songs, “In Pictures,” is best known as the title cut from Alabama’s 1995 release. They released as a pretty successful single. I’m not sure how many people know Davis’ version of it, but it was included as one of the seven previously released songs on her 1998 I’m Yours album, which is how I got to know it.

The track tells the story of a father estranged from the mother of his child. He does his best to support them from afar and as a reward has to watch his child grow up through photographs and thus miss all the important milestones:

He missed her first steps

Her first words

And “I love you daddy” is something he seldom heard.

Oh, it hurts him so…

To watch his girl grow…

Up in Pictures

Davis’ vocal on the song is a revelation. You can hear the ache in her throat as she sings the tune, especially the final verse. It’s a record for the ages.

From what I heard of Shoot On The Moon, this is a fabulous album. I can see why it didn’t make her a star — the songs just didn’t have that extra radio friendly punch Davis’ needed to push her over the top. But she always had the goods, that much is true.

Grade: A-

Classic Rewind: Loretta Lynn and family – ‘The Great Titanic’

Today is the anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic:

Week ending 4/14/18: #1 singles this week in country music history

1958 (Sales):  Oh Lonesome Me / I Can’t Stop Loving You — Don Gibson (RCA Victor)

1958 (Disk Jockeys): Oh Lonesome Me — Don Gibson (RCA Victor)

1968: You Are My Treasure — Jack Greene (Decca)

1978: Someone Loves You Honey — Charley Pride (RCA)

1988: Famous Last Words of a Fool — George Strait (MCA)

1998: Perfect Love — Trisha Yearwood (MCA)

2008: You’re Gonna Miss This — Trace Adkins (Capitol Nashville) 

2018: Meant To Be — Bebe Rexha featuring Florida Georgia Line (Big Machine)

2018 (Airplay): Most People Are Good — Luke Bryan (Capitol Nashville) 

Classic Rewind: Patty Loveless ft Ricky Skaggs – ‘Some Morning Soon’

Classc Rewind: Ronna Reeves – ‘My Heart Wasn’t In It’

Album Review: Linda Davis – ‘Linda Davis’

In 1992, Linda released her second album. Like the first it was produced by label boss Jimmy Bowen, with Linda getting a co-production credit, but it was uninspiringly self-titled. Where her earlier singles had failed to make much impact, the singles from this record were resoundingly ignored by country radio.

The reason why is clear when you listen to ‘There’s Something ‘Bout Loving You’, an upbeat but thoroughly forgettable pop-country song which now sounds very dated. It was written by hitmakers Chris Waters and Tom Shapiro, but was one of their poorest efforts, and a really bad choice for a single for an artist hoping to make her breakthrough. The follow-up, Dewayne Blackwell’s ‘He Isn’t My Affair Anymore’ is a much better song, an emotional ballad which Linda delivers with conviction, although it has a bit of a musical theater vibe.

The best song on the album is a cover of John Conlee’s 1982 hit, ‘Years After You’, which Linda manages to make her own with a lovely, emotionally invested vocal, although the production has not aged well, and the backing vocals are curiously old-fashioned for an album made in 1992. But the song itself is a great Thom Schuyler song about an enduring love which long survives a breakup:

I knew that it wouldn’t be easy
For my heart to find somebody new
But I never thought
It still would be broken in two
These years after you

They tell me time is a natural healer
It kinda smooths the pain away
But this hurtin’ within hasn’t yet given in
And it’s been over 2000 days
I still remember the taste of your kisses
And your eyes that were beautifully blue
I can still hear the sound of your voice
When you said we were through

There’ve been mornings when I couldn’t wake up
There’ve been evenings when I couldn’t sleep
My life will be fine for months at a time
Then I’ll break down and cry for a week
‘Cause when I told you I’d love you forever
I know you didn’t think it was true
But forever is nothing compared to some nights I’ve been through
These years after you

‘LA To The Moon’, another emotional ballad, is a fine song written by Susan Longacre and Lonnie Wilson about a country star and the hometown sweetheart left behind:

You were always different
Had a big dream in your heart
This old cowtown couldn’t hold you down
Once you caught your spark
I stood out on the runway
And watched you taxi past
I would’ve gone anywhere with you
But you never asked

You went from Beaumont to LA
And LA to the moon
An overnight success
You put a lot of years into
You tell me nothing’s different
I’m just a call away from you
But it feels more like the distance
from LA to the moon

‘Isn’t That What You Told Her’ is another excellent song, written by Karen Staley and Karen Harrison, with a barbed lyric addressed to a man with a questionable past record in love by his new love interest, who is understandably dubious. It is very well sung, but once more with dated backings.

‘Tonight She’s Climbing The Walls’ is a story song about a neglected wife ready to make a break, written by Craig Bickhardt and very well sung by Linda. ‘The Boy Back Home’, written by Gary Harrison and Tim Mensy, is another ballad, about nostalgia for a first love, and is quite nice in a more contemporary style.

Of the up-tempo material, ‘Just Enough Rope’ (later cut by Rick Trevino) is fun. ‘Love Happens’ and ‘Do I Do It To You To Too’ are both forgettable pieces of filler.

As a whole, this album is hampered by some of the production choices, but it did show Linda was a great singer given the right material, and some tracks are definitely worth downloading.

The commercial failure of this record was to lead to an unexpected second chapter in Linda’s career. Released by her label, she signed up as Reba McEntire’s backing vocalist, and the result would make country music history.

Grade: B

Classic Rewind: Dawn Sears and the Time Jumpers – ‘Someone Had To Teach You’

Clasic Rewind: Reba McEntire – ‘Have I Got A Deal For You’

Album Review: Linda Davis – ‘In A Different Light’

Released on Capitol-Nashville in February 1991, In A Different Light was Linda’s first major label album. Released nearly a decade after her moderately successful duets with Skip Eaton as “Skip & Linda”, this album was Linda’s first opportunity to shine as a solo act.

As it happened, the album itself failed to chart and none of the three singles released from the album make much of an impact on the country charts.

By my lights, this is not at all a country album. I think it should have been marketed to the easy listening/middle of the road. Don’t get me wrong, Linda Davis is a fine singer but the singles from this album received virtually no airplay on county stations around Central Florida.

The album opens with “In A Different Light,” an overwrought ballad from the pens of Ed Hill and Jonathan Yudkin. This song was released as the first single and died at #61.

Next up is “Some Kind of Woman” by Annette Cotter and David Leonard. This song was released as the second single from the album, and died only reached #68. I think this gritty up-tempo ballad was the best track on the album – similar to something Brooks & Dunn might have released, but I suspect that country radio was so disgusted with the previous single, that they simply did not give this song a chance

 Well, I guess you’re showing me a thing or two

Loving with a vengeance every night with someone new

And I got this funny feeling, it’s for my benefit

So I’m gonna take it as a kind of compliment

 

Oh, I must be some kinda woman

Look how many women you seem to need

To take the place of one good one

And give you what you had when you had me

Oh, I sure must be some kinda woman

 

Since you need a different girl each night

There must not be a one of them, knows how to do you right

So add them little numbers, try and equal me

Meanwhile I’ll just take it as a form of flattery

Next up is “Three Way Tie” (written by Mary Beth Anderson, Lisa Silver, and Carol Grace Anderson) was the third single released. Another overwrought ballad, this song failed to chart, and frankly, it sounds like something any cocktail lounge singer might tackle.

None of the remaining tracks were released as singles:

“From Him to Here” (Mark D. Sanders, Verlon Thompson) is a pretty good mid-tempo song, that actually sounds like a country song. I think this would have made a decent single

“If Your Greener Grass Turns Blue” (Cindy Greene, Marsha Spears) has a bit of that country cocktail lounge feel to the mid-tempo instrumentation but it is a decent song, that Linda sings well. This would have made a decent single.I had never even been outside the county line

Unless you count the million times I left inside my mind

In my day dreams, I could see

The way the luck would shine on me

When I finally found the wings to fly

As my mama helped me pack my suitcase

She said you know I love you and I’ll say it once more anyway

 

So you’ll know what to do if your greener grass turns blue

If your sunny sky turns gray

Sometimes you gotta run

To see just what you’re running from

Here at home there’ll always be place for you

If your greener grass turns blue

“There’s a Problem at the Office” (Annette Cotter, Kim Tribble) is a bland ballad …

He calls to tell me he’ll be late again

There’s a problem at the office

So don’t wait up for him

And I guess I shouldn’t worry but I do

Cause a woman senses changes

Her man is going through

 

He’s changed the way he’s worn his hair for years

And bought some shirts in colors

I’ve never seen him wear

And when we touch that old time feeling’s gone

There’s a problem at the office

And it’s hitting close to home

… whereas “Knowin’ We’ll Never Know” (Jim Rushing, James Dean Hicks) is a nice ballad of what might have been

What if we’d stayed together
What if we’d really tried
Would we still be in Tennessee
Would I have been your bride
Would we be blessed with children
Lovingly watching them grow
Oh the hardest part of seeing you now
Is knowing we’ll never know

We’ll never know
How much we missed
By not taking love all the way
If we held on just a little bit longer
Where would we be today

“White Collar Man” (Vernon Rust) is a slow semi-acoustic ballad, nicely sung about a husband who places all of his priorities on work and none on family.

“The Crash of 29” (Ron Moore, Billy Henderson) has a very folksy sound to it. The crash of 29 has nothing to do with the great Wall Street Crash of 1929, but rather the self-realization that time is marching on and she is getting bored. This a pretty good album track

“If I Could Only Be Like You” (Kendall Franceschi, Quentin Powers, Reba McEntire) is a slow piano ballad, nicely sung, but ultimately not very interesting.

Linda’s vocals on this album are very reminiscent of Reba McEntire, only not quite as powerful as Reba’s vocals – sort of a Reba-lite. I know Linda Davis can actually sing country music and do it well as I have heard her do it. I don’t dislike this album, but I am not very charged up about it. I regard two of the three singles released as mistakes, with several of the album tracks being more single-worthy.

This album has keyboards, synthesizers and, cello, but no fiddle, steel guitar, mandolin, banjo or anything else to lead you to think of this as a country album.

Grade: C+         

Classic Rewind: John Conlee – ‘Ain’t No Way To Make A Bad Love Grow’

Classic Rewind: Linda Davis – ‘Heart Over Mind’