My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Album Review: Asleep at the Wheel – ‘Asleep at the Wheel’ (1974)

r-6847990-1427926933-1911-jpeg1974’s Asleep at the Wheel was the band’s second release and the first for Epic Records. It was also the first of a pair of eponymous albums; another album titled Asleep at the Wheel would be released about a decade later by MCA.

Produced by Norro Wilson, the album was almost completely out of step with mainstream country, and as such it did not sell particularly well. It did, however, produce the band’s first chart single, “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie”, which peaked at #69. But because it did not follow the the commercial trends of the day, it does not sound as dated as many of the albums released in that era. In fact, it is every bit as enjoyable today as it was over 40 year ago.

It is an eclectic collection of Western swing, straight country and 1940s-style jump blues. Two singles were released: “Don’t Ask Me Why (I’m Going to Texas)” written by Ray Benson, Leroy Preston and Kevin Farrell, and the aforementioned “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie” which had been a big R&B hit in 1946 for Louis Jordan & His Tympany Five. Despite the inclusion of some fiddle, steel and honky-tonk piano, “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie” doesn’t sound very country at all but it is very well done. “Don’t Ask Me Why” is more Bob Wills-style Western swing and is also quite well done.

“You and Me Instead”, another Kevin Farrell composition, is a more contemporary number with a 70s-style string section. It’s a different style than we typically expect from Asleep at the Wheel and I wonder why no one though to release this one as a single. I wouldn’t rank it among my favorites on the album but it seems like it would have had some mainstream appeal in 1974.

“Jumpin’ at the Woodside” is a Count Basie tune that still sounds like mainstream 1940s big band music, despite some excellent fiddle from the great Johnny Gimble, who played on seven of the album’s eleven tracks, including “Don’t Ask Me Why”.

If pressed to pick a favorite, I would probably choose “Last Letter”, which is sung beautifully by band member Chris O’Connell, who at times sounds a bit like Connie Smith. The song itself was written by Rex Griffin, who had a hit with it in 1937. It is a story told by a jilted spouse as she writes a suicide note to the spouse who abandoned her. Griffin wrote the song based on his own real-life experience. O’Connell takes the spotlight again on one other track, “Our Names Aren’t Mentioned (Together Anymore)”, which is performed as a duet with its writer Leroy Preston. Cindy Walker’s “Miss Molly” is another highlight.

Leroy Preston is not as good a vocalist as Ray Benson, but he sings lead adequately on four tracks, the best of which is “I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday”.

Asleep at the Wheel is an outstanding album from start to finish: the material is impeccable, and the musicians are excellent. The instrumental solos are as enjoyable as the vocals. I couldn’t find a single weak moment to criticize. I highly recommend it for anyone who is interested in Western swing — or swing music in general.

Grade: A+

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One response to “Album Review: Asleep at the Wheel – ‘Asleep at the Wheel’ (1974)

  1. Paul W Dennis October 7, 2016 at 9:20 am

    Calling “Choo Choo Ch’Boogie” a big hit is understating it considerably. The song spent 18 weeks at #1 on the R&B charts (the all-time leader) and reached #7 on the pop charts. Louis Jordan also had two #1 country hits (when the chart was folk & country) and a #1 pop hit along the way, He is also the career leader in most weeks at #1 on Billboards R&B charts with 113 weeks (Drake is second with 84 weeks and Stevie Wonder third with 71 weeks).

    While “Choo Choo Ch’ Boogie” may not sound very country to the reviewer’s ears during the late 1940s – early 1950s many country artists recorded boogies, many of them released as singles, most notably Tennessee Ernie Ford

    I consider “The Last Letter” to be the saddest song ever written, so much so that some artists (Waylon Jennings among them) leave off the last verse, changing the meaning of the song from a suicide note to merely another sad song. Glen Campbell and Jack Greene both had terrific recordings of the song

    I did not realize that this album was available digitally. My copy is vinyl, picked up about a year after it was released. I agree with the reviewer – this is a terrific album

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