My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Album Review: Lonestar – ‘Coming Home’

lonestar_-_coming_homeLonestar released their sixth studio album in 2005. They had enjoyed enormous success in the ten years since their debut, but Coming Home featured the band in the beginnings of their commercial decline. This transition period saw them switch producers to Justin Niebank and score just one top ten single.

That lone top ten, “You’re Like Coming Home” peaked at #8. The mid-tempo rocker is perfect radio fodder and I quite enjoy the beat, but the lyric lacks depth. Power balled “I’ll Die Tryin,” which likely would’ve been a big hit just a few years earlier, stalled at #48. Consequently, both of the singles were recorded by Emerson Drive on their What If album a year earlier.

Coming Home featured twelve tracks, with five co-written by Richie McDonald. The best of these is “Too Bottles of Beer,” a lovely mid-tempo fiddle and steel soaked ballad about a couple bonding over the titular beverage. The rest have good production values offset by terrible lyrical compositions. McDonald’s bandmate Michael Britt co-wrote “Noise,” which is lyrically identical to the Kenny Chesney hit of the same name, but a totally different song. It’s a far better presentation than Chesney’s take on the topic, which peaked at #6 earlier this year.

Coming Home is a squarely commercial album packed with filler and little worth. It’s a far cry better than anything coming out of Nashville these days, which is a plus, but it still doesn’t make for essential listening. Despite the annoying repetitiveness, I do like “I Am A Man,” which has a good message. But I couldn’t find much of anything that truly blew me away.

Grade: B-

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One response to “Album Review: Lonestar – ‘Coming Home’

  1. Chris September 30, 2016 at 4:59 pm

    Lonestar’s albums have always been peppered with a lot of dreck and this one is no exception. That said, I do think Coming Home is one of their most consistent records. Meaning I can actually listen to it from start to finish, something I can’t bearably do with any of their other albums, old or new.

    Incidentally, do you prefer the Emerson Drive versions of those two songs on here? I think they’re fairly similar sounding. The ED versions were produced by Richard Marx and sound equally bombastic.

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