My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Week ending 1/23/16: #1 singles this week in country music history

220px-Danseals1956 (Sales): Sixteen Tons — Tennessee Ernie Ford (Capitol)

1956 (Jukebox): Sixteen Tons — Tennessee Ernie Ford (Capitol)

1956 (Disc Jockeys): Sixteen Tons — Tennessee Ernie Ford (Capitol)

1966: Giddyup Go — Red Sovine (Starday)

1976: Convoy — C.W. McCall (MGM)

1986: Bop — Dan Seals (EMI America)

1996: It Matters to Me — Faith Hill (Warner Bros.)

2006: Jesus, Take The Wheel — Carrie Underwood (Arista)

2016: Die a Happy Man — Thomas Rhett (Valory)

2016 (Airplay): Die a Happy Man — Thomas Rhett (Valory)

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4 responses to “Week ending 1/23/16: #1 singles this week in country music history

  1. Paul W Dennis January 24, 2016 at 10:14 am

    After thorough domination of the #1 slot, Webb Pierce falls off completely this week. There will one more song coming up shortly then that’s it as far as Billboard is concerned (Although Cashbox and Record World will have more #1s for Webb). In a 208 week period starting in March 1952 through the next #1, which will arrive next month, Webb will have had the #1 record on one or more of Billboard’s country charts for 111 weeks.

    Tennessee Ernie Ford sweeps the charts this week in 1956. Although a massive hit, “Sixteen Tons” will prove to be his last #1 record

    • Occasional Hope January 24, 2016 at 11:14 am

      I love Sixteen Tons.

      • Erik North January 24, 2016 at 1:56 pm

        And what does it say that “Sixteen Tons” endures sixty years after it was a huge hit, while virtually everything else on the radio today is, to put it nicely, disposable?

        “You load sixteen tons, and what do you get?
        Another day older and deeper in debt
        St. Peter, don’t call me ’cause I can’t go
        I owe my soul to the company store.”

        As a footnote, “Sixteen Tons” was also #1 on the pop chart for, I believe, eight weeks.

    • luckyoldsun January 24, 2016 at 7:58 pm

      Post -“Sixteen Tons,” Tennessee Ernie de-emphasized his country boogie music, as he became a national TV entertainment figure and Americana and Gospel singer. The country hits dried up, but Ford had massive success with his l-p albums of his staid, serious, stentorian, hymns and spirituals, which must have sounded like they were the closest thing to being sung by God himself.

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