My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Album Review: Lorrie Morgan: ‘A Moment In Time’

a moment in timeHer first album in five years, and only her second in a decade, A Moment In Time was billed as Lorrie’s version of a classic country tribute. Unlike many of its type, Lorrie’s vision leaned more to the Nashville Sound and the sophisticated pop country associated with her father George Morgan, with some outright pop material from the same era. It was released on James Stroud’s Stroudavarious Records in association with Country Crossing, and produced by James Voorhis and Wally Wilson.

For something so long anticipated, A Moment In Time was a massive disappointment. Sadly Lorrie’s voice was showing marked signs of deterioration, thickened, sometimes coarse and lacking the flexibility and tone of her youth. The album was recorded in two live sessions, which may have been a mistake given the changes to Lorrie’s vocal power. This is one record when picking one of several takes might have led to a better result.

A few tracks are simply unlistenable, even with Lorrie’s voice muffled by heavy orchestration, particularly the opening number, ‘Cry’ (a pop standard which was a country hit for Lynn Anderson in 1972 and then Crystal Gayle in 1986) where she sounds like a foghorn. Sequencing the worst track at the start was a bad idea, but things (and Lorrie’s voice), do improve. She also sounds shaky vocally on an otherwise gutsy stab at ‘Wine Me Up’, but ‘Til I Get It Right’ works quite well, with Lorrie’s vocal issues suiting the song’s weary vulnerability.

Lorrie’s voice is harder to take at times on the classic country duet ‘After The Fire Is Gone’ although fellow 90s star Tracy Lawrence sounds fairly good. Raul Malo’s high tenor seems to lift Lorrie to one of her best performances on the record, as her duet partner on a passionate ‘Easy Lovin’’.

Traditional honky tonk ballad treatment of Mel Street’s hits ‘Borrowed Angel’ and ‘Loving On Back Streets’ are surprisingly successful. ‘Alright, I’ll Sign The Papers’ has a lovely retro arrangement and the vocal is pretty good. The Patsy Cline hit ‘Leavin’ On Your Mind’ is also very good, with a sweeping string arrangement and Lorrie’s best vocal on the album. This was the single selected to promote the record, although predictably it didn’t get a lot of attention as it is as far from current as one could imagine. These four are the pick of an uneven collection, together with ‘I’m Always On A Mountain When I Fall’ (a Haggard album cut written by Chuck Howard) which has quite attractive instrumentation with a Western feel and is well sung.

Falling into the mediocre category, ‘Are You Lonesome Tonight?’ is crooned and whispered without much shading in the delivery. ‘By The Time I Get To Phoenix’ is okay although it plods a bit compared to the soaring original. The AC ‘Break It To Me Gently’ is sung well enough but is rather boring, and ‘Misty Blue’ is even less interesting.

I was very disappointed by this album when it came out, mainly due to the deterioration of Lorrie’s voice. Revisiting the record for this review, I found it wasn’t as bad as I had remembered it, with a handful of decent tracks. However it remains one of her less stellar efforts, and is certainly not essential listening for any but the most ardent of fans.

Grade: C+

2 responses to “Album Review: Lorrie Morgan: ‘A Moment In Time’

  1. Razor X August 28, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    I was terribly disappointed in this album, mainly due to the poor vocal performance on most of the tracks. I just couldn’t get beyond how bad her voice sounded. Your point about selecting the best take instead of a live-in-the-studio recording is well taken. Her voice sounds better on the albums she’s done since this one and that may be the reason why. I’ll have to go back and give it another listen since you found that it wasn’t quite as bad as you remembered it to be.

  2. Something In Red September 4, 2013 at 2:22 pm

    Lorrie had vocal cord surgery in 2001 after having voice issues. I know those issues came to a head in late July that year because I was going to the first concert she cancelled. Sammy Kershaw still put on a great performance though so all wasn’t lost.

    I’m pretty sure that was also the same year Connie Smith had vocal cord surgery. How Connie still sounds great 12 years out and Lorrie’s hasn’t been the same since baffles me. If I had to guess why though, I think Lorrie wanted her voice back for that Color of Roses live album done in late 2001 and possibly rushed it.

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