My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Remembering Conway Twitty (September 1, 1933 – June 5, 1993)

Conway Twitty’s untimely death on June 5, 1993 was a devastating loss to country music. On the 16th anniversary of his passing, we’d like to take a look back and pay homage to the man who was known as “the best friend a song ever had”:

22 responses to “Remembering Conway Twitty (September 1, 1933 – June 5, 1993)

  1. J.R. Journey June 5, 2009 at 1:44 pm

    I wish I had gotten the chance to see Conway Twitty live. I was only 9 when he died though. His is one of the more tragic losses to country music, though he’s not always remembered that way. But he was only 59 when he died and still a viable artist – definitely still a great vocalist.

    • Razor X June 5, 2009 at 2:04 pm

      I saw him in concert back in 1987, on the same show as George Jones and Randy Travis. He rarely talked to the audience onstage but he put on a great show.

      The day he died was the day my mom and I were planning a surprise 50th birthday party for my dad. I’d gone out to buy some ice and heard the news on the car radio. It was big shock.

    • ACcountryFan June 5, 2009 at 9:59 pm

      I was 16 when he passed away…country radio was still playing his songs on a recurrent basis. “She’s Got a Man on Her Mind”, his 1991 hit, was still being played as was “That’s My Job”, “I Couldn’t See You Leavin”, and others…so he was still fairly active on radio play-lists when he passed away. I never got to see him in concert…one of the things I wish I could have done was go to Twitty-City and lose myself in the surroundings.

  2. Occasional Hope June 5, 2009 at 3:12 pm

    These are some great performances too.

  3. Paul W Dennis June 5, 2009 at 3:21 pm

    I saw him live on several occasions. Like many artists, his earliest country recordings were his best , say up until 1980

    He was a terrific singer, although not a great entertainer

    • ACcountryFan June 5, 2009 at 9:49 pm

      This is a nice tribute to Conway on the anniversary of his passing away! This is jerryopry from the CMT message board using my other screen name, ACcountryFan, since it’s the one I use for my blogger account…I know you didn’t write this but it bothered me enough to say something about it…

      ============================
      quote: “I saw him live on several occasions. Like many artists, his earliest country recordings were his best , say up until 1980.

      He was a terrific singer, although not a great entertainer.”
      =============================

      I take issue with this statement. Conway’s songs entertained his audience…and his stage presence was entertaining…the way he’d reach for those notes and lean forward and let loose with so much emotion when he sang. He really got into all of his songs and you could tell it when he performed on stage and watching him perform was entertaining as ever.

      Have you ever seen him perform the song “Why Me, Lord?”. Watch him sing “Goodbye Time” in the above video from a 1988 Music City News awards show…if you don’t call that entertaining then hundreds of thousands of people, myself included, would strongly disagree with you. He didn’t need to tell jokes and mingle to be entertaining. He let his songs “do the talking”.

      The second part of your comment about his material. You’re leaving out a ton of music if you cut him off at 1980!? What was your criteria for randomly picking 1980? Didn’t you like anything he recorded after 1980? “Tight Fittin’ Jeans” is from 1981…didn’t you like it? How about “Lost in the Feeling” with that great steel guitar from 1983? Maybe “Slow Hand”…I love that song…I also like “Heartache Tonight”…just listen to him SING on that song. Oh…then there’s 1986’s “Fallin’ For You For Years”…dynamic vocals…1989’s “She’s Got a Single Thing In Mind”…that vocal performance is mind-blowing because he was 55 when he recorded it…did you like “Somebody’s Needin’ Somebody” from 1984? “Crazy in Love” from 1990? You have to love “I Couldn’t See You Leavin” from 1990…it’s a nice little toe-tapper.

      Since you cut him off at 1980 do any of these songs sound familiar to you is what I should be asking.

      • Razor X June 5, 2009 at 10:14 pm

        I can’t think of any of Conway’s songs that I don’t like. Obviously in such a vast catalog, there are some I prefer to others. With the exception of “It’s Only Make Believe” I don’t think any of his rock-and-roll hits are up-to-par with his country material, but I wouldn’t go so far as to say that I dislike it.

        • ACcountryFan June 5, 2009 at 10:45 pm

          i hadn’t even thought about the rock/pop songs until you mentioned it. i’m not into his rock songs as I am the country songs…as you mentioned, “It’s Only Make Believe”…I liked a song called “C’est Si Bon” that he did and there was “Lonely Blue Boy” and “Danny Boy” and another one I liked, “Halfway to Heaven”…but that’s an entirely different format and the approach to the music was different as well.

          ironically, though, his re-recordings of his pop songs sounded way better but that’s just because his voice aged and matured. i prefer his 1976 re-recordings of “It’s Only Make Believe”, “Lonely Blue Boy”, “Danny Boy”, and “Mona Lisa”. he put them on a vinyl album I have called NOW AND THEN.

          And I’m with you…I wouldn’t go so far to say I dislike anything Conway recorded. He’s a lot like other great singers…he can make anything listenable…even a song with such an unusual name like “Snake Boots” {from his 1987 album}.

      • Paul W Dennis June 6, 2009 at 9:21 am

        I stand by my comment about him not being a great entertainer. He did improve over time. The first time I saw him was in 1967 when he was basically just stood there and sang – and did not say one word to the audience, leaving all the speaking to his guitar player Joe E. Lewis – the last time was in 1989 by which time he had developed a little stage presence. Yes, I enjoyed his shows but I can name any number of lesser (or equal) singers who were better at live performing. Conway was a superlative vocalist who could get away with just singing his songs

        I used 1980 as (an admittedly arbitrary) cutoff because from that point forward Conway started cutting a lot of songs I did not like and yes, I am familiar with all of the songs you cited (and I have almost all of his post 1980 albums). “The Rose”, “Slow Hand”, “Julia” and “Heartache Tonight” are the sort of dreck I cringed at hearing him sing. Yes I love “Lost In The Feeling”, it’s my favorite Conway song (mostly because of John Hughey’s exceptional steel playing) .

        By the way , it is not unusual for a male singer to still have all of his vocal chops at age 55. The decline usually sets in much later – Ray Price and Ferlin Huskey are both in their 80s and still sing better than George Strait or most current country singers

        By the way – there are some gems in the early rock and roll material – “Lonely Blue Boy” was a great song, and major hit – many years he called his band after the song – the “Twitty Birds”name wasn’t in use until sometime during the 1970s

        • ACcountryFan June 6, 2009 at 12:46 pm

          Wow…you’re picky and have limited music taste and a narrow mind if you dismiss the songs as “dreck”.

          Apparently, judging by your comment, you like songs that are slow and almost mid-tempo…or, more importantly, you hate pop music so much that you inherently hate songs that have a pop-feel and so as a result you tend to not like those kinds of songs. You do know that in order for Conway to continue being successful that he had to record with a modern sound and sing modern country songs? Were you a fan of his or are you just an observer? A fan wouldn’t be so nit-picky and dismiss nearly everything their favorite recorded and not enjoy the ride…so I’m curious.

          I agree about Ray Price but there’s no way George Strait is inferior to either him or Ferlin Huskey of all people!? Do you have a dislike for anyone who’s current?

          When you say Conway started doing a lot of songs you didn’t like…what was it about the songs that you didn’t like? I’m trying to understand where you’re coming from…it looks like to me that if you were/are a fan of his you would enjoy all of the times his songs were on the radio and all the success he had during the 1980’s and not cringe when his songs came on.

          If Conway were to have continued singing songs that sounded, musically, like they were recorded in the 1960’s or 1970’s he wouldn’t have been on the radio with his current songs in the 1980’s and early 1990’s. Do you object to his progressiveness?

          I know you said you didn’t like the songs he chose to record…but yet it’s those songs that afforded him the ability to continue having #1 and Top-10 hits beyond 1980…so am I partially right when I asked if you objected to his progressiveness and his embracing of modern/new country? A lot of artist’s in his generation didn’t embrace modern country music and the changes in each sound that came along and their career on the radio suffered for it…but Conway’s didn’t…and George Strait, for example, continues to change and adapt to the sounds that come along in country music and that’s a big reason why Strait is set to have his 45th #1 hit with his current single, “Living For the Night”.

          Instead of belly-aching over how songs sound, why not just enjoy your favorite singer’s is all I say…especially if they’re still turning out the hit songs.

        • Razor X June 6, 2009 at 1:22 pm

          If you take a look at the catalog of anyone who’s had longevity in the music business and you’ll find periods in which nearly everything they did was great, followed by periods that were not so great. Which is which is a matter of personal preference.

          You make some valid points about the need to move with the musical times, but also bear in mind that part of being a true artist is remaining true to one’s craft. I don’t want to see any of my favorite singers record something that doesn’t fit with who they are musically, just because they think it will get them airplay on the radio. A true artist doesn’t pander to the shifting commercial climate. I’m not saying that Conway did this, but a lot of today’s artists are and mainstream country music is suffering because of it. I’d rather see my favorite artists releasing quality music on an independent label than hear them sing something substandard on the radio.

          In addition, as fans we do artists a disservice if we adopt an “I love you no matter what you do” kind of mentality. We owe it to them to be honest and let them know when they’ve strayed too far off course. I bought all of Martina McBride’s albums except for the last two, which I didn’t feel were up to par. It doesn’t mean I’m not still a fan. If she releases something I like in the future, I’ll buy it, but I’m going to hold out until she gets back on track. Maybe it’s just my age showing, but I tend to scrutinize my favorite artists’ music more now than I did a few years ago. Every artist has strong and weak periods in their career and there’s nothing wrong with recognizing and acknowledging that.

        • Paul W Dennis June 6, 2009 at 3:49 pm

          “Wow…you’re picky and have limited music taste and a narrow mind if you dismiss the songs as “dreck”.

          Apparently, judging by your comment, you like songs that are slow and almost mid-tempo…or, more importantly, you hate pop music so much that you inherently hate songs that have a pop-feel and so as a result you tend to not like those kinds of songs… ”

          Where to start ??

          1) Picky – well yes – I would think every listener should be picky. But I like many kinds of music – Armstrong, Basie, Ellington, SInatra, Coltrane, The Clancy Brothers, Three Dog Night, Les Paul, The Beatles, Beach Boys, Narvel Felts , Rolf Harris, Ella, Sarah Vaughan, Etta James, Poco, James Galway, Ernest Tubb, Max Bygraves, George Formby, Crosby, Jolson, Humperdinck, BB King. If you can find a trend there please let me know – except all of these artists performed from the heart and made music that did not sound, in any way, shape or form, manufactured.

          2) The tempo of the song isn’t that important to me BUT I prefer mid-tempo to up-tempo songs, not slow to mid-tempo as you seem to assume and many of Conway’s later efforts just d–r–a–g .

          3) To me the production can make all the difference. To make myself clear – I hate the sound of synthesizers. Any song that uses them gets automatically downrated in my esteem. In many of Conway’s later efforts, the steel guitar virtually disappeared

          4) Conway wouldn’t be among my ten favorite male singers, but even among my favorite singers, there are some inferior choices of materials and some albums that are not as good as others

          5) I am not sure what your definition of “pop” is – if you mean Frank SInatra, Dean Martin, Peggy Lee, Tony Bennett , DInah Shore, Doris Day, Perry Como, The Ink Spots, The Drifters, Louis Jordan and Frankie Laine – then yes , I am a huge fan of pop music. If you define pop music as something else, then maybe I’m not such a fan

          6) I know that Conway tried to stay with the current trends but in the few years before his death, his pride of place among the country music elite had faded away and his planned “comeback” would not have succeeded. FINAL TOUCHES would not have spawned any big hits even had Conway been around to promote the album.

          7) As Jerry Reed once sang – “when you’re hot you’re hot, when you’re not, you’re not”. The first time George Strait has consecutive singles that stiff at radio, radio will be through with him. He has the advantage of still looking fairly youthful (Conway had aged considerably by 57) and has very carefully limited his exposure. Conway performed hundreds of dates each year and had to some extent become “old hat”

          8) Never mistake a record’s chart position for its quality. Many great songs never become big hits and many big hits are soon forgotten. At least a third of Strait’s #1 records are songs no one remembers, ditto for Alabama or Merle Haggard or any one else with a long list of hits – the artist and label can sometimes push a song to #1 that would die in the mid 20s if recorded by Joe Slobotnik , even if the record Joe recorded was George (or Conway) under an assumed name

  4. ACcountryFan June 6, 2009 at 2:21 pm

    quote: “Every artist has strong and weak periods in their career and there’s nothing wrong with recognizing and acknowledging that.”

    RazorX: Of course…there’s nothing wrong with that…but there’s nothing wrong with feeling your favorites can do no wrong with what they sing, either.

    When you remarked that we owe them honesty…who’s to say those who feel that their favorite’s never sing a terrible song are being dishonest? There’s nothing wrong with NOT being critical. You mentioned how much scrutiny you put on artist’s now…but some never do…and I fall into that category. It doesn’t make be any less intelligent, or make me become dishonest in some way, because I choose to not nit-pick!?

    quote: “We owe it to them to be honest and let them know when they’ve strayed too far off course.”

    See, this is what I have a problem with…the line “let them know when they’ve strayed off course” comes across like we’re claiming ownership over an artist and they better do exactly as we see fit or else. That’s not being fair to the artist is it?

    That line of thinking will cause an artist to be restrictive if the artist feels their fans only want them to be a certain way and sing a certain kind of song and only feature certain instruments, etc etc etc. This creates a situation where the artist, if he or she falls into the trap, becomes a prisoner and has little ability to adapt and grow because they’re spending their career pandering to the whims and wishes of a few…which is a good thing in some people’s minds but yet if this same artist panders to country radio then, well, that’s all wrong. Is that about the size of it?

    A true artist, since that came up in the discussion, doesn’t want to be limited, either by the fans or by a record company, with what they want to record…and they want the freedom to sing a variety of different kinds of songs…and that is what Conway did and that is what George Strait is doing…and it seems people want to rip them apart for doing so.

    We have no right to say either of them isn’t “staying true to themselves”. That decision is left up to the artist…it’s the artist who knows if he or she likes the songs they’re recording. Conway remained the same throughout a large part of his country career when it came to picking songs…he remained true to his beliefs and what he looked for in a song. As you said, you’re not accusing Conway of not staying true to himself…but still, I felt the need to defend him all the same because of how I took some of the comments downplaying his status in country music.

    • Razor X June 6, 2009 at 3:06 pm

      It doesn’t make be any less intelligent, or make me become dishonest in some way, because I choose to not nit-pick!?

      Of course not. But can you honestly say that all of the songs in any given artist’s catalog are equal? That there aren’t some that you like more than others? That’s not to say that you hate any of the songs, but I’m sure you’ll find that certain ones are your favorites, and others are ones you don’t listen to as much.

      There’s nothing wrong with NOT being critical. You mentioned how much scrutiny you put on artist’s now…but some never do…and I fall into that category.

      That’s fine. But why get upset when someone else does scrutinize an artist’s music? I agree that people sometimes over-scrutinize. But look at this this way: suppose I’m a person who’s unfamiliar with Conway Twitty and am interested in learning more about his music. He’s got a huge catalog and I don’t even know where to start. Paul’s advice is helpful because it gives me a place to get started — the period 1965 to 1980. Telling me that all of the music is equally wonderful doesn’t help me at all. That’s not to say that I’ll necessarily end up agreeing with Paul’s assessment in the end, but it at least gives me a starting point.

      See, this is what I have a problem with…the line “let them know when they’ve strayed off course” comes across like we’re claiming ownership over an artist and they better do exactly as we see fit or else. That’s not being fair to the artist is it?

      As the ones who are being asked to buy the CDs and concert tickets, fans have every right to express their likes and dislikes. In any situation in life, we don’t do others any favors by telling them they are wonderful all the time, even if they aren’t. Parents make this mistake with children all the time, as do employers who don’t want to have awkward confrontations with employees who aren’t towing the line. We all learn more from the mistakes we make, than we do from the things we get right. And since we can’t always recognize when we’ve made a mistake, we rely upon those who care about us to let us know.

      That line of thinking will cause an artist to be restrictive if the artist feels their fans only want them to be a certain way and sing a certain kind of song and only feature certain instruments, etc etc etc. … A true artist, since that came up in the discussion, doesn’t want to be limited, either by the fans or by a record company, with what they want to record…and they want the freedom to sing a variety of different kinds of songs…and that is what Conway did and that is what George Strait is doing…and it seems people want to rip them apart for doing so.

      All I’m saying is, the fans have a right to speak their minds. The artist isn’t under any obligation to listen to them. If they want to follow a different course for artistic reasons, more power to them. That isn’t pandering; quite the opposite, in fact.

      • ACcountryFan June 6, 2009 at 3:33 pm

        quote: “That’s not to say that you hate any of the songs, but I’m sure you’ll find that certain ones are your favorites, and others are ones you don’t listen to as much.”.

        Well, yes…that is a much better way of saying things than to just refuse to acknowledge anything after a certain point in time. Whenever I write about Conway elsewhere I never say “everything is great” but I do say “in my opinion, Conway never recorded a bad song…some songs are more stronger than others but to say he recorded an absolute dud is a bit of a stretch…and with so many songs to choose from I find it increasingly difficult to pick a favorite era, I love them all.”

        So, yes, I know that not every song that a singer records is going to set the world on fire or appeal to each and every person, I deliberately refrain from specifying a time period for people to go seek out because if you do that, someone not familiar with Conway, if they like what they hear, they’ll tend to become fixated only on one era of his career. So, I think it’s best to not specify any certain time frame and just suggest people check out his music for themselves.

        Paul’s commentary went about it all wrong, I think, and that’s why I responded to it. But anyway, he’s sticking to how he thinks as he said in his reply and I’m sticking with how I think and you’re sticking by the way you think…so we’re all sticking to the way we see things is one of the few things we all agree on.

  5. ACcountryFan June 6, 2009 at 5:45 pm

    quote from Paul Dennis: “In many of Conway’s later efforts, the steel guitar virtually disappeared.”

    So, are you implying that a song isn’t country if there’s no steel guitar? The steel guitar was part of Conway’s sound in his early country records but more importantly what nobody is picking up on is this: country radio PLAYED songs that sounded a whole lot more country than they do now. Conway had no choice but to change with the sound or his career would’ve been over with and you know it…he once said that he sings for the country music fans and not for himself, otherwise, he said, that he’d stay home and sing to himself if that was the case. So, if the country fans wanted to hear a certain “sound” or a certain kind of lyric, he found songs that he hoped the audience would like.

    quote from Paul Dennis: “his planned “comeback” would not have succeeded. FINAL TOUCHES would not have spawned any big hits even had Conway been around to promote the album.”

    This is the first I’ve heard that FINAL TOUCHES was planned as a comeback? He’d never went away. 1992 was a down year…no CD was released that year…but his recent hits of the last several years were still on the radio so people knew who he was.

    Given the state of country radio so many years after the fact it’s quite easy in hindsight to say that there wouldn’t have been any big hits from the album…but without Conway physically being able to promote the music and MCA not pushing it, given the circumstances surrounding the album, I don’t see where you can say with any degree of certainty that it would not have contained any big hits.

    The thing is nobody knows for sure. Conway was certainly capable of having radio hits if MCA did their job…he was still popping up in radio playlists because I remember him being played…his last Top-10 hits kept him familiar to “new country” listeners…and then he dies and country radio stops playing his songs altogether like he never existed. But if people who listened to country radio in 1991, 1992, and early 1993 they’ll recall that radio was still playing his music and after he died they stopped…so FINAL TOUCHES in my mind anyway was never really given any kind of a chance to be successful. The album reached the Top-30…which surprised me. I didn’t think it would chart that high because given his longevity and it being an album, not a single, I thought it would chart lower than that.

    It’s often been said that Conway was more of a singles than album’s artist. His album sales, especially those released after 1977, paled in comparison to the sales that he had with the singles. There were several albums in particular that featured two #1 hits but the album itself didn’t even chart higher than #30. So, it should be noted that sales of albums were secondary to the sales of the 45 RPM single. His 1990 album, “Crazy In Love”, which featured the hit title track and another Top-5 hit, peaked at #35…country artist’s today usually have million selling albums each and every release and their singles race up the charts…Conway on the other hand continued to have singles that raced up the charts even after the album sales cooled down.

    About George Strait…

    Actually, he’s had quite a few songs not perform to his standards. Every other single from him goes #1, it seems, but there have been several songs that had not. There was a stretch of singles in 2003-2005…somewhere in that time period…that peaked below #1…a few peaked at #11…and for an artist that’s known for having #1 singles, such an occurrence should cause some concern because the single’s on the charts now are a reflection of airplay only. So, he’s had several singles that have stalled in the lower Top-10 and some that just miss the Top-10. I don’t feel George will have consecutive singles that have a poor reception at radio anytime soon…each time he has a single not perform well the next one performs better…and the next one performs even better…until he reaches #1 once again. His last single hit #1, the previous one hit #7, but the one before that hit #1. When “Seashores of Old Mexico”, for example, hit #11 for Strait in 2006, he bounced back with “Give It Away” which spent several weeks at #1…and he followed that with another #1 “It Just Comes Natural”. Then when it looked like he may not have another #1 because of two singles peaking at #2 and #3 respectively out he emerges with “I Saw God Today” which hit #1 in 2008.

    But no, I don’t think Strait will allow himself to have back to back singles not make the Top-10…if he senses that it isn’t his time anymore he’ll retire instead of going on and on and on. Conway didn’t have the chance to back away…in his mind he felt he was capable of having hit songs but he died before he could sense that it perhaps wasn’t his time anymore.

    • Razor X June 6, 2009 at 9:19 pm

      There were several albums in particular that featured two #1 hits but the album itself didn’t even chart higher than #30. So, it should be noted that sales of albums were secondary to the sales of the 45 RPM single. His 1990 album, “Crazy In Love”, which featured the hit title track and another Top-5 hit, peaked at #35…country artist’s today usually have million selling albums each and every release and their singles race up the charts…Conway on the other hand continued to have singles that raced up the charts even after the album sales cooled down.

      The Billboard country singles chart is based on airplay, not sales. There have been a lot of artists that have racked up radio hits without selling a lot of albums.

  6. ACcountryFan June 6, 2009 at 7:25 pm

    quote from Paul Dennis: “At least a third of Strait’s #1 records are songs no one remembers, ditto for Alabama or Merle Haggard or any one else with a long list of hits.”

    I like the way you can speak for everyone else and reduce artist’s career’s as meaningless because they lost YOUR attention years ago. People have short attention spans as it is…it’s highly likely they’d remember a song that was a hit last month let alone 10 or 15 years ago unless they’re a FAN of the artist. So, again, it’s another unfair accusation in a long list of them. You’re in a dream world and not thinking realistically if you feel everything an artist put’s out has to stand the test of time or be “from the heart”. It isn’t like that in the real world of making records.

    I’ve said all that I wanted to say anyway…I think it’s pretty low to say the things that’s been said on a blog that I thought would be free from negative comments directed at Conway. You pretty much called him a lousy entertainer who lacks any “true” stage presence and isn’t good enough to rate inside your precious Top-10 of male vocalists. That’s about all I took from the posts that you made.

    • Paul W Dennis June 7, 2009 at 12:23 am

      “…I think it’s pretty low to say the things that’s been said on a blog that I thought would be free from negative comments directed at Conway. You pretty much called him a lousy entertainer who lacks any “true” stage presence and isn’t good enough to rate inside your precious Top-10 of male vocalists. That’s about all I took from the posts that you madeI can suggest ”

      If this what you think you read, I can suggest several good remedial reading classes. Apparently to be allowed to say anything about an artist, I must exhault him. Sorry to disappoint you but I refuse to simply fawn over any artist. If you want to run a Conway Twitty fan club so be it, but don’t be putting words in my mouth. I own about 50 of his vinyl albums so obviously I thought highly of Conway as a singer

      Clearly he had lost traction with radio before his demise. The last three singles before the FINAL TOUCHES album charted at 57, 22 and 56. That’s a far cry from the #11 and #7 placings of a few of Strait’s records. The liner notes to FINAL TOUCHES didn’t actually use the word “comeback’, but here is the actual verbiage – “FINAL TOUCHES was an album designed to launch Conway Twitty into yet another phase of his extraordinary career… ”

      I am sorry that you consider honesty as “pretty low” . Actually I feel sorry that you seem incapable of independent critical thought. Maybe some day you will grow up

      -30-

    • Leeann Ward June 7, 2009 at 12:29 am

      All I can say about this whole heated exchange is that if the definition of being a fan is to like everything that an artist does, I’m a fan of no one, which is simply not true.

      At any rate, great post. I’ve always loved Conway Twitty. He and George Jones were the only “old time” artists that I liked as a kid just getting into country music, which was soon after Twitty’s death.

  7. Kassie Fisette May 6, 2010 at 10:15 pm

    Dude! I was contemplating writing a post about the same thing! If I do is it ok if I link to this post?

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