My Kind of Country

Country music from a fan's point of view since 2008

Tag Archives: Tim Stafford

Album Review: Alison Krauss & Union Station – ‘Every Time You Say Goodbye’

everytimeAlthough Alison Krauss had received her fair share of critical acclaim almost from the very beginning of her career, it wasn’t until the release of 1991’s I’ve Got That Old Feeling that she began to slowly build some commercial steam as well. That album peaked at #61 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart. The following year’s Every Time You Say Goodbye was her first collaboration with Union Station to chart. It only reached a modest #75, but it was still a notable achievement for a bluegrass act at that time. It won the Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album in 1993, becoming the group’s first, and Alison’s second overall.

At this particular point in time Union Station consisted of Ron Block (banjo), Barry Bales (bass), Tim Stafford (guitar), Adam Steffey (mandolin), and of course, Alison on fiddle. She shares lead vocal duties with the other band members, as she had done on the group’s previous effort Two Highways. Alison has always been at her best when singing ballads, so she allows the other band members to take the lead with some of the more uptempo numbers such as “Another Night”, “It Won’t Work This Time”, and “Another Day, Another Dollar”, one of the alubm’s highlights which was written by future Union Station member Dan Tyminiski.

Although Every Time You Say Goodbye finds Alison assuming production duties for the very first time, the album’s content doesn’t differ much from her earlier works. The pop flourishes which characterize her later work are largely absent here. The album’s best tracks are the ballad “Heartsrings”, “New Fool” and the title track, which is the sole contribution by John Pennell, who had provided much of the material for the group’s previous album as well as Alison’s solo efforts. All three of these tracks were released as singles, though none of them charted. Rounder had begun releasing singles to country radio beginning with 1991’s “I’ve Got That Old Feeling” but only “Steel Rails” had charted and it peaked at an underwhelming #73. It would be another three years before Alison enjoyed her mainstream breakthrough with her cover of Keith Whitley’s “When You Say Nothing At All”, after which she became a much sought-after guest vocalist in Nashville. At this stage, however, her success and that of Union Station, were still confined to the bluegrass world. Every Time You Say Goodbye is a solid effort that will appeal to Alison’s fans, but will probably do little to win over bluegrass skeptics.

Grade: A

Album Review: Cumberland Gap Connection – ‘A Whole Lotta Lonesome’

The Cumberland Gap Connection is a little-known bluegrass band, but one who has given me a very pleasant surprise with this album (on Kindred Records). I understand it is their fourth, although it’s the first I’ve come across (thanks to a link posted on The 9513 a few weeks ago). The members hail from Kentucky and Tennessee, and the record was recorded in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee.

Usual lead singer Mike Bentley has an attractive smooth tenor voice, laid back style, and natural understated sense of phrasing, and is also a fine songwriter who was responsible for five of the album’s twelve tracks. He also plays guitar, and his talents provide the band’s focus and the core of the record’s appeal. My favorite of these (and one of the album’s highlights) is the dejected ‘Waiting At the Harbor’, a very well written song with some interesting imagery. One of life’s lost souls, the protagonist of this song has no idea of what to do with his life:

How can you find a home when you can’t move on?
Feels like I’m waiting at the harbor for a train

On a similar theme and almost as good is the opening track ‘Travel All Alone’, which reflects thoughtfully on regret for past choices leading to the loss of a loving home.

The high lonesome sound of ‘Ode To The Mountain Man’ is about a father teaching the protagonist “how to be a good man”, in a way which shows all those country living anthems they might just be missing the point:

It ain’t about where you come from
It’s about where you stand
Just living in the mountains don’t make you a mountain man…

You might live in the city in a mansion doing well
Or you might own a two room shack on top of the hill
The almighty dollar don’t make you good or bad
It’s what’s inside that you let out that makes the mountain man

I assume this is specifically about, and inspired by, Bentley’s late father, who died in 2006 and to whom he dedicates his work on the record.

Read more of this post

Album Review: Kim Williams – ‘The Reason That I Sing’

williamskimI’ve mentioned before that I always enjoy hearing songwriters’ own interpretations of songs which they have written for other artists. The latest example comes from Kim Williams, a name you should recognize if you pay attention to the songwriting credits. Kim has been responsible for no fewer than 16 number 1 hits, and many more hit singles and album tracks over the past 20 years. Now he has released an album containing his versions of many of his big hits, together with some less familiar material.

The album is sub-titled Country Hits Bluegrass Style, although the overall feel of the record is more acoustic country with bluegrass instrumentation provided by some of the best bluegrass musicians around: Tim Stafford (who produces the set) on guitar, Ron Stewart on fiddle and banjo, Adam Steffey on mndolin, Rob Ickes on dobro, and Barry Bales on bass, with Steve Gulley and Tim Stafford providing harmony vocals. Kim’s voice is gruff but tuneful, and while he cannot compare vocally to most of those who have taken his songs to chart success, he does have a warmth and sincerity which really does add something to the songs he has picked on this album.

Kim includes three of the songs he has written for and with Garth Brooks, all from the first few years of the latter’s career. ‘Ain’t Going Down (Til The Sun Comes Up’), a #1 for Garth in 1993, provides a lively opening to the album, although it is one of the less successful tracks, lacking the original’s hyperactivity while not being a compelling or very melodic song in its own right. ‘Papa Loved Mama’ is taken at a slightly brisker pace than the hit version, and is less melodramatic as a result – neither better nor worse, but refreshingly different. ‘New Way To Fly’, which was recorded by Garth on No Fences, also feels more down to earth and less intense than the original, again with a very pleasing effect.

The other artist whose repertoire is represented more than once here is Joe Diffie. The lively western swing of ‘If The Devil Danced In Empty Pockets’ (written with Ken Spooner) with its newly topical theme of being well and truly broke is fun. Although ‘Goodnight Sweetheart’ (from the 1992 album Regular Joe) was never released as a single, this tender ballad about separation from a loved one has always been one of my favorite Joe Diffie recordings. Kim’s low-key, intimate version wisely avoids competing vocally, but succeeds in its own way.

One of my favorite hit singles this decade was ‘Three Wooden Crosses’, a #1 hit for Randy Travis in 2002, which Kim wrote with Doug Johnson. A movie based on the story is apparently in development. I still love Randy’s version, but while Kim is far from the vocalist Randy is, this recording stands up on its own terms, with an emotional honesty in Kim’s delivery which brings new life to the story.

Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 130 other followers